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Stanford scholar named MacArthur fellow

Jennifer Eberhardt says the MacArthur fellowship will allow her to expand her research on race and the criminal justice system. (Photo: John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation)

Jennifer Eberhardt says the MacArthur fellowship will allow her to expand her research on race and the criminal justice system. (Photo: John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation)

Stanford’s Jennifer Eberhardt has been named one of the 2014 fellows of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. A social psychologist, she studies the racial elements in the perceptions of crime.

BY CLIFTON B. PARKER

Stanford psychologist Jennifer Eberhardt, who studies race and the law, has been named one of the 2014 fellows of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

The fellowships, given to scholars for their achievement and potential, include a $625,000 stipend over five years. The honors rank among the most prestigious prizes in academia and the creative arts. They are sometimes referred to as the “genius” awards.

“I feel it gives me the space to pursue my research with new energy and motivation,” Eberhardt said. “It reaffirms how important the issues of race and inequality are in the legal system.”

When the foundation initially contacted her to inform her that she was named a fellow, Eberhardt was overwhelmed.

“I had no inkling, no idea they were considering me. It felt like a pivotal moment in my life.”

When the awards were publicly announced Tuesday night, Eberhardt received numerous calls and emails from colleagues, friends and family. “I think I had only a couple hours of sleep,” she chuckled. Thursday promised to be even busier – in addition to the MacArthur media inquiries, she was due to give two different presentations on racial disparities to the U.S. Department of Justice.

“But I feel good and have the energy,” Eberhardt said. “I’ll keep doing what I’m doing.”

Joined Stanford in 1998

Since she arrived on campus in 1998, Eberhardt has examined the role that racial stereotypes play in the criminalization of African-Americans. She joined the Stanford faculty after teaching at Yale University, and is currently an associate professor in psychology and co-director of SPARQ, a university initiative that addresses social problems.

Her colleague Greg Walton, a Stanford assistant professor of psychology, said that Eberhardt’s research has vital social significance. “In helping understand our minds, Jennifer’s research helps us see the kinds of changes we need to make in society to help give all people a fair shot,” he said.

A first-generation college graduate from Cleveland, Ohio, Eberhardt said that her parents instilled in her a love of education. She witnessed the disparity in education in the different neighborhoods where she grew up, and soon fell in love with learning. Her late father, Harlan, a postal mail worker, “understood the power of education,” she said.

And her late mother, Mary, was inspired enough by her daughter’s collegiate success – she earned a doctorate from Harvard – to go to college herself at midlife.

“Education is transformational,” Eberhardt said.

Expanding research

Now, the MacArthur fellowship will greatly expand her research plans and resources to connect with real-world policy. “I hope to work with more law enforcement agencies and do things off the beaten path,” Eberhardt said, noting that she’s currently engaged with the Oakland Police Department on the analysis of racial profiling data. “Many of the (law enforcement) agencies collect the data but often don’t know what to do with it,” she said.

As Eberhardt pointed out, although African-Americans constitute only 12 percent of America’s population, they represent 40 percent of the nation’s prison inmates.

Her statistical analysis has shown that police officers are more likely to identify African-American faces than white faces as criminal. In one experimental study, people who were exposed to black faces were then more likely to identify a blurry image as a gun than those who were exposed to white faces or no faces.

Eberhardt plans to combine social psychological insights with technology to improve outcomes in the criminal justice context and elsewhere.

“I’m hopeful to bring about real social change,” she said.

The California Black Chamber of Commerce seeks an Executive Director

 

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The Board of Directors of the California Black Chamber of Commerce (CBCC) invites qualified candidates to apply for the position of Executive Director. The California Black Chamber of Commerce is a state-wide business association that has been in existence for over 20 years, headquartered in Sacramento, California. The CBCC is the states’ largest African-American organization representing more than 8, 000 African-American- owned businesses. It serves as the umbrella organization for more than 22 member chambers statewide and it actively promotes the economic growth and development of entrepreneurs.

Attached is the position description that describes the responsibilities, experiences and education requirements and working environment for this position.

All Applicants are encouraged to submit a cover letter/ letter of interest and resume by email at: cbcc@calbcc.org with attachments, please include “Executive Director” in the subject line or by mail to the following:
Mailing Address:
California Black Chamber of Commerce
ATTN: Aubry Stone
1600 Sacramento Inn Way, Suite 232
Sacramento, California 95815

ALL APPLICATIONS MUST REACH THE CBCC OFFICE
NO LATER THAN
5:00 PM ON OCTOBER 1, 2014 TO BE CONSIDERED.

Application link:
http://origin.library.constantcontact.com/download/get/file/1103180196120-363/President+Position+Description.pdf

Help the Red Cross prepare for emergencies by donating blood

Eligible donors encouraged to give during National Preparedness Month

 

LOS ANGELES, CA — Disasters can strike at any time, and the American Red Cross encourages eligible donors to help their communities prepare for emergencies by giving blood during National Preparedness Month.

The mission of the Red Cross is to help the public prevent, prepare for and respond to emergencies. During National Preparedness Month, the Red Cross reminds Americans to take simple steps to get ready for emergencies in their homes, workplaces and communities. One way to support this mission is to become a regular blood donor.

A stable blood supply is central to ensuring patient needs are met in emergencies. Blood can take up to three days to be tested, processed and made available for patients. It’s the blood already on the shelves that can help save lives when disaster strikes.

To help increase donations during the month of September, those who come out to donate blood or platelets throughout the month will receive a coupon by email for a free haircut at participating Sport Clips locations.

Appointments to donate and help the Red Cross prepare for patient needs across the country can be made at redcrossblood.org. Information about other ways to help prepare for emergencies is available at redcross.org.

Upcoming blood donation opportunities:

Apple Valley

9/17/2014: 12 p.m. – 6:15 p.m., Sitting Bull Academy, 19445 Sitting Bull Rd

Bloomington

9/23/2014: 12 p.m. – 6:15 p.m., Hope Academy Charter School, 1055 Bloomington Ave

Chino

9/24/2014: 1 p.m. – 7:15 p.m., Chino Neighborhood Activity Center, 5201 D Street

Chino Hills

9/18/2014: 1:45 p.m. – 8 p.m., Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, 3354 Eucalyptus

Rancho Cucamonga

9/23/2014: 1 p.m. – 7:15 p.m., TR AM Red Cross Ontario Chapter, 10600 N Trademark Pkwy Suite 406

9/24/2014: 9 a.m. – 3:15 p.m., First American, 11175 Azusa Ct

San Bernardino

9/18/2014: 10 a.m. – 4:15 p.m., San Bernardino Valley College, 701 South Mount Vernon Ave

West Covina

9/24/2014: 12:45 p.m. – 7 p.m., Cameron Elementary School, 1225 E Cameron West

How to donate blood

Simply call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) or visit redcrossblood.org to make an appointment or for more information. All blood types are needed to ensure a reliable supply for patients. A blood donor card or driver’s license or two other forms of identification are required at check-in. Individuals who are 17 years of age (16 with parental consent in some states), weigh at least 110 pounds and are in generally good health may be eligible to donate blood. High school students and other donors 18 years of age and younger also have to meet certain height and weight requirements.