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Commission for Women accepting nominations for the 2015 Woman & Young Lady of the Year Awards

thumb_gt521q2eThe County of Riverside Commission for Women is accepting nominations for its 2015 Woman of the Year and Young Lady of the Year awards. The awards are bestowed upon an outstanding woman and young lady in each supervisorial district who have demonstrated an exceptional commitment to the community by working to improve the status of women, young ladies and families within Riverside County.

The Young Lady of the Year participants must be 10 to 18 years of age. Nominations may be submitted by U.S. mail, email or fax.

Nomination applications are due no later than 5 p.m. Feb. 6 and should be as detailed as possible. To be considered:

  1. Nominee must reside/work/attend school in the supervisorial district of Riverside County for which she is nominated.
  2. Nomination must outline the areas in which the nominee has made an important and noticeable contribution to her community as a leader who helped make Riverside County a better place for women and/or young ladies to reach their full potential.
  3. Nomination must explain the areas in which the nominee has gained the respect of her peers. Is she often called upon for advice, mentoring or decisions in these areas? Is she willing to help?
  4. Nominee may have been recommended for a specific achievement, program, project, cumulative volunteerism or professional achievements that demonstrate her impact on the lives of the women and families in Riverside County for the better.

Current members of the County of Riverside Commission for Women are ineligible for nomination. Nominations will be reviewed by distinguished Riverside County leaders and the name of each award winner will be forwarded to the Commission for Women. Each winner will be selected based on her work to bring about social and economic change, promote women’s equality, serve as an outstanding role model to women and girls, work on behalf of women’s issues or outstanding performance within her profession to further advocate women’s rights and improve the status of women in Riverside County.

Award winners will be notified and awards will be presented at the Riverside County Board of Supervisors meeting on April 14 at 9 a.m. The Board’s meeting chambers is at 4080 Lemon St. in Riverside, first floor.

Nominations may be submitted by mail to: County of Riverside Commission for Women

Attention: Sundae Sayles

2015 Woman of the Year & Young Lady of the Year

4080 Lemon St., 7th Floor

c/o Human Resources

Riverside, CA 92501

 

Faxed nominations may be sent to (951) 955-3479 and email nominations should be sent to CFWEMAIL@rivcocfw.com. For more information, go to www.rivcocfw.com.

Governor Brown Gives His Fourth Inaugural Address

Mixed Reviews On How to Solve Some Of The States Most Persistent Problems

By Simeon Gant, California Black Media 

Assembly Members Jim Cooper and Kevin McCarty on the Assembly Floor after Governor Jerry Browns unprecedented fourth inaugural address. Assemblyman Jim Cooper said California needs to address drug addiction and did not support proposition 47, the ballot measure that releases low-level offenders into the community  Cooper Assembly District 9 is from Elk Grove, McCarty 7th District is from Sacramento.

Assembly Members Jim Cooper and Kevin McCarty on the Assembly Floor after Governor Jerry Browns unprecedented fourth inaugural address.
Assemblyman Jim Cooper said California needs to address drug addiction and did not support proposition 47, the ballot measure that releases low-level offenders into the community
Cooper Assembly District 9 is from Elk Grove, McCarty 7th District is from Sacramento.

For the first time in the state’s history California elected one person to the Governor’s office four times. The Honorable Edmund “Jerry” Brown was sworn in today in front of both houses of the legislature, California’s judges and a bevy of state officials. Brown combined the State of the State address with his inaugural speech to include his previous accomplishments and a wish list of upcoming issues addressing California.

Brown quickly spoke to the usual concerns of most Californians – education, crime and public safety, health, human services and overall fiscal stability. The most unique aspect of his speech however, was how little has changed.

Brown recalled his first time in the Assembly Chambers. It was1959 during his father, Governor Pat Brown’s inauguration, “That was 56 years ago, yet the issues that my father raised bear eerie resemblance to those we still grapple with today: discrimination, the quality of education and the challenge of recruiting and training teachers, the menace of air pollution, and its danger to our health; a realistic water program; economic development; consumer protection and overcrowded prisons.”

Members of the Legislative Black Caucus responded to the Governor’s speech with hope and optimism for concerns of education equity and a reduction in health disparities throughout the state.

“The Governor is a visionary and very committed to California,” said Assembly Member Shirley Weber, Ph.D., chair of the Assembly Budget Committee. Focusing on how education equity may play out this year, the San Diego representative lawmaker said, “Local Control Funding Formula is still a work in progress. What they do with the resources they get for those special populations is going to be a challenge because we have already run into some roadblocks in terms of accountability and transparency. I want to see outcomes.”

Governor Brown touted the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) as “a much fairer system of school funding.” He informed the audience LCFF’s shift toward giving local school districts more control, giving the state less power and delivering more money to schools “based on the number of students from foster care, low-income families and non-English –speaking parents.”

Freshman Assembly Member Tony Thurmond, a Democrat from Richmond was also pleased to hear the Governor include an increase in health insurance coverage under the Medi-Cal Program.

As chair of the budget subcommittee on health and human services, Assembly Member Thurmond relates to the relatively silent healthcare crises of hospital and clinic closures, “In my district we have a hospital that could close because of the low reimbursement rate in Medi-cal.” He continued, “We know that people of color and low income people are disproportionally impacted around healthcare disparities and we are going to need to make some expansions around Medi-Cal.”

Governor Brown’s speech covered many of the state’s social and economic bases, confidently including the passage of water projects, environmental protection, a $2.8 billion Rainy Day Fund, driver’s licenses for undocumented citizens, $59 billion investment in roads, highways and bridges, the elderly, pensions and criminal justice.

Freshmen Members of the Assembly Tony Thurmond, left and Jim Cooper right share a moment responding the Governor Jerry Brown’s record fourth inaugural address. Thurmond wants to see an expansion of Medi-Cal. Cooper wants to see an emphasis on drug rehabilitation and criminal sentencing. Thurmond is from Richmond, W. Contra Costa, Berkeley, Oakland and Alameda

Freshmen Members of the Assembly Tony Thurmond, left and Jim Cooper right share a moment responding the Governor Jerry Brown’s record fourth inaugural address. Thurmond wants to see an expansion of Medi-Cal. Cooper wants to see an emphasis on drug rehabilitation and criminal sentencing. Thurmond is from Richmond, W. Contra Costa, Berkeley, Oakland and Alameda

Referring back to his father’s 1959 inaugural speech Brown reiterated, “He talked about identifying “’those prisoners who should never be released to prey again on an innocent public,’” but he also said, “’we should also determine whether some prisoners are now kept confined after punishment has served its purpose.’”

Newly minted Assemblyman Jim Cooper served most of his career working in law enforcement in Sacramento. He feels realignment—sending many low-level offenders from state prisons to the local jail systems — “is a good start.” However he proclaims the key is to reduce the number of people hooked on drugs and coming out of prison without a plan to get unhooked.  “One of the big issues is substance abuse,” Cooper said.

Since the recent passage of Proposition 47which released from prison low-level drug offenders throughout the state, Cooper says drug courts now don’t have the same teeth in the law to “hold over their head.”  He says prior to this new law the judges could “make them get clean” but no longer have that option.

Governor Brown doesn’t exactly agree with Cooper’s assessment about Proposition 47. His primary concern is overcrowding of prisons. “In the 1970’s we had12 prisons holding fewer than 30,000 prisoners…our system then grew to a peak of 34 prisons, with an inmate population of 173,000, eating up more than 10 percent of our budget dollars. He said the state dramatically lengthened sentences and added a host of new crimes and penalty enhancements to include more than 5,000 separate criminal provisions and over 400 penalty enhancements.

While it is common knowledge California’s prisons are disproportionally populated by men of color – a large number of African American and Latino heritage – the unemployment lines also see this struggling population as an ongoing challenge to California.

Governor Brown’s speech referred to a shrinking unemployment rate, currently sitting at approximately 7.2 percent in California, it’s still lower than the whopping 13.6 percent nationally for African Americans as reported by the US Department of Labor. None of these numbers include Blacks that have simply quit looking for jobs out of fatigue and futility. Governor Brown’s speech didn’t address a solution to the unemployment issue, but strategically included “California has seen more than 1.3 million new jobs created in just four years.”

Many of the new jobs on the horizon may very well come in what he deems three ambitious goals to be accomplished within the next 15 years.

He reminded the audience of the state’s efforts to reduce greenhouse gases and carbon pollution to 431 million tons by 2020. Looking forward to 2030 he said the state should, “Increase from one-third to 50 percent our electricity derived from renewable sources; Reduce today’s petroleum use in cars and trucks by up to 50 percent; and Double the efficiency of existing buildings and make heating fuels cleaner.”

These new efforts require a new and improved workforce, trained in the development of wind, water, solar and waste conversion into energy, specialist in alternative fuel vehicles and a renewed process of redeveloping California’s infrastructure.

The culmination of his speech addressed the potential for jobs by protecting our environment. He said, “We must build on rock, not sand, so that when the storms come, our house stands.”

 

Loma Linda University Health to Announce Partnership with Zipcar to Offer Car Sharing on Campus

ZipCarDeanElmoreLoma Linda University Health will announce a new partnership with Zipcar, one of the world’s leading car sharing networks, to offer a Zipcar car sharing program on campus.  The new program will be launched on Wednesday, January 7, noon, on campus in front of Magan Hall, where two of the new vehicles will be showcased.  The event will feature a large group of curious staff and students, brief remarks from officials, and computerized sign ups, in which the first 100 individuals will receive free one-year memberships.

The convenient transportation option will be available at an affordable rate 24 hours a day, seven days a week, for students, faculty, and staff ages 18 and older, as well as members of the local community ages 21 and over.

Loma Linda University Health will initially offer two vehicles, a Toyota Prius and a Ford Focus. The Zipcars will have designated parking spots located in a campus lot near the southwest intersection of Anderson and Mound streets (lot P) for convenient pick-up and return.  Zipcars will be available on-demand and easily reserved and accessed 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

This year, Loma Linda University Health students, faculty, and staff can join for $25, with rates for Zipcar vehicles on campus starting as low as $7.50 per hour and $69 per day.  After the first year, members will pay an annual membership fee of $35. Gas, insurance, and up to 180 miles of driving per day are included in Zipcar rates, and cars can be reserved for as little as an hour or for multiple days.  Loma Linda University students, faculty and staff can join Zipcar at www.zipcar.com/llu.

“Loma Linda is pleased to partner with Zipcar to help reduce the number of cars on campus by giving students, staff, patients, and community members mobility without the need for car ownership,” said Richard H. Hart, MD, DrPH, Loma Linda University Health President.  “Zipcar is becoming a popular option on campuses across the country.  We believe this resource will help us continue to make our campus a more pedestrian and bike friendly place; it fits well with our culture of wholeness.  Some students and others who don’t own cars will no longer need to buy a car when they move to Loma Linda. Enjoy the Zipcar convenience!”

Participating members with smartphones, including iPhones and Android devices, will be able to  download the Zipcar mobile application to make reservations, lock and unlock the vehicles, and honk the horn to help locate the vehicle.  They will also be able to make reservations over the phone or on Zipcar’s website.

“Together with Loma Linda University Health, we’re enabling this next generation of drivers to experience a new generation of cars and transportation in a way that is both convenient and cost-effective, not to mention fun,” said Katelyn Lopresti, general manager for Zipcar University.

Zipcar has established relationships with more than 400 universities across North America. For more information and to learn how to become a member of Zipcar at Loma Linda University Health, please visit www.zipcar.com/llu.  Additional information and promotions can also be found by following @ZipcarU on Twitter.