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Author Archives: WSS News

Extreme Walk 4 Diabetes, Death Challenge

Yolanda Holder

Yolanda Holder

CORONA, CA – Last year Inland Empire resident and 2x Guinness World Record holder of “Most Marathons Run in a Calendar Year”, Yolanda Holder, set foot on a trial of walking from Corona to the Bay Area. That prior year in 2012, she power walked 120 marathons by breaking her own record of 106 marathons in 2010.

The “Walking Diva” is set to break yet another record. On Friday, August 22 to Sunday, August 31 she will be walking from Corona, California to Las Vegas, Nevada to spread the word about healthy living and the benefits of walking 30 minutes a day. This event will also be used as a fundraiser for the American Diabetes Association.

For those who would love to become corporate sponsors or would like to know more about Yolanda Holder and her campaign, visit www.yolandaholder.com.

Local Teen Stands Up Against Bullying with New Invention

Brittany Evans

Brittany Evans

RIVERSIDE, CA – While teens are surrounded by a world of social media, selfies and hashtags, one teen in Fontana is making a difference by breaking the mold of conformity. Her name is Brittany Evans, 18, and unlike most teens Brittany would rather be about her business than taking tons of pictures to show off to her friends. She not only has beauty and brains but she is the first in her family to become an inventor.

Her invention is called Sparkbudz (patent pending) it is an all new earphone in which you can magnetically attach and detach when you are alone or with a friend. “It’s a cool concept, I love it!” says Brittany. “Every day I wake up and thank God for such an amazing, witty invention”.

In addition to her building her brand, Ms. Evans is also finishing her education in communications at Riverside Community College. After completing her degree, her plans are to become a motivational speaker and mentor, and she is already getting a jump start through speaking engagements at her local church.

“I myself have been bullied, threatened and been back stabbed. I never want to see anyone go through what I have encountered”, Evans states.

Since then she has forgiven her enemies and works hard to fight against bullying.

She continues, “You don’t have to start a big campaign to fight against bullying. You can start off small by giving advice to a friend or peer who is being bullied, or ultimately by reporting it!:

The Sparkbudz inventor is giving back through her work that she currently does at her school in assisting others in their public speaking abilities. With her earnings that she makes, she donates 10 percent towards her tithes and offering and 80 percent towards her God given plan.

“God has blessed me tremendously to the point where I feel I don’t deserve it. I give not because I have to but because I want to,” Evans said.

For updates on Speakbudz, please follow @official_sparkbudz on Instagram.

IRS Repeats Warning about Phone Scams

WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service and the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration continue to hear from taxpayers who have received unsolicited calls from individuals demanding payment while fraudulently claiming to be from the IRS.

Based on the 90,000 complaints that TIGTA has received through its telephone hotline, to date, TIGTA has identified approximately 1,100 victims who have lost an estimated $5 million from these scams.

“There are clear warning signs about these scams, which continue at high levels throughout the nation,” said IRS Commissioner John Koskinen. “Taxpayers should remember their first contact with the IRS will not be a call from out of the blue, but through official correspondence sent through the mail. A big red flag for these scams are angry, threatening calls from people who say they are from the IRS and urging immediate payment. This is not how we operate. People should hang up immediately and contact TIGTA or the IRS.”

Additionally, it is important for taxpayers to know that the IRS:

  • Never asks for credit card, debit card or prepaid card information over the telephone.
  • Never insists that taxpayers use a specific payment method to pay tax obligations
  • Never requests immediate payment over the telephone and will not take enforcement action immediately following a phone conversation. Taxpayers usually receive prior notification of IRS enforcement action involving IRS tax liens or levies.

Potential phone scam victims may be told that they owe money that must be paid immediately to the IRS or they are entitled to big refunds. When unsuccessful the first time, sometimes phone scammers call back trying a new strategy.

Other characteristics of these scams include:

  • Scammers use fake names and IRS badge numbers. They generally use common names and surnames to identify themselves.
  • Scammers may be able to recite the last four digits of a victim’s Social Security number.
  • Scammers spoof the IRS toll-free number on caller ID to make it appear that it’s the IRS calling.
  • Scammers sometimes send bogus IRS emails to some victims to support their bogus calls.
  • Victims hear background noise of other calls being conducted to mimic a call site.
  • After threatening victims with jail time or driver’s license revocation, scammers hang up and others soon call back pretending to be from the local police or DMV, and the caller ID supports their claim.

If you get a phone call from someone claiming to be from the IRS, here’s what you should do:

  • If you know you owe taxes or you think you might owe taxes, call the IRS at 1.800.829.1040. The IRS employees at that line can help you with a payment issue, if there really is such an issue.
  • If you know you don’t owe taxes or have no reason to think that you owe any taxes (for example, you’ve never received a bill or the caller made some bogus threats as described above), then call and report the incident to TIGTA at 1.800.366.4484.
  • If you’ve been targeted by this scam, you should also contact the Federal Trade Commission and use their “FTC Complaint Assistant” at FTC.gov. Please add “IRS Telephone Scam” to the comments of your complaint.

Taxpayers should be aware that there are other unrelated scams (such as a lottery sweepstakes) and solicitations (such as debt relief) that fraudulently claim to be from the IRS.

The IRS encourages taxpayers to be vigilant against phone and email scams that use the IRS as a lure. The IRS does not initiate contact with taxpayers by email to request personal or financial information. This includes any type of electronic communication, such as text messages and social media channels. The IRS also does not ask for PINs, passwords or similar confidential access information for credit card, bank or other financial accounts. Recipients should not open any attachments or click on any links contained in the message. Instead, forward the e-mail to phishing@irs.gov.

For more information or to report a scam, go to www.irs.gov and type “scam” in the search box.

More information on how to report phishing scams involving the IRS is available on the genuine IRS website, IRS.gov.

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