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Obituary: Robert Carl Hill, Jr.

Robert Carl Hill, Jr.

Robert Carl Hill, Jr.

Robert Carl Hill, Jr. of Highland passed away on Tuesday, August 2, 2016.  He was employed by the County of San Bernardino for many years.  His next career was spent at Fedco as supervisor of the maintenance crew, something he did while he worked as owner/CEO of Red-Leg Building Maintenance Company.  He retired in 1999.

Robert is survived by his wife, Margaret Hill; children, Jacqueline D. Hill, Anner Minette Hinds and Robert C. Hill, III; sisters Beverly McCabe and Linda Austin; brother Michael Austin; six grandchildren, nine great-grandchildren, Uncle Jimmy Jimmerson, cousins, nieces, nephews, and friends.  He was preceded in death by his parents, Cornelius & Alma Ruth Austin; brothers John Hill, Cornelius Austin, Jr. & Darrell Austin; and granddaughter Najah Hill.

A Night of Reflection will be Friday, August 12, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Community Hospital of San Bernardino, Henderson Auditorium.  A Memorial Service will be held Saturday, August 13, beginning at 2 p.m. at the Norman Feldheym Library.

In lieu of flowers, please make donations to the Robert Carl Hill, Jr. Diabetic Scholarship Fund, c/o Maggie’s Kids Foundation, P.O. Box 705, Patton, CA   92369-0705.

Young, Black Job Seekers Spruce Up Resumes, Aviation Careers Opening

By McKenzie Jackson, California Black Media

Recent college grads and job seekers under the age of 31 have a week to fly into a job applicant pool for a well-paying gig with the country’s national aviation authority.

The Federal Aviation Administration is accepting applications from entry-level candidates across the U.S. for air traffic controller positions until August 15.

And at least two Congressmen are looking to increase African-American outreach for the jobs. In the spring Reps. Carlos Curbelo of Florida and Sean Patrick Maloney of New York introduced House Resolution 5292, the Air Traffic Controller Hiring Improvement Act of 2016.

Among other things, the bipartisan legislation, which is currently making the rounds in the nation’s capital, aims at improving hiring and staffing of air traffic controllers at the FAA by directly notifying air traffic controller vacancies to Historically Black Colleges and other minority institutions.

Curbelo said in a May statement, “I am very pleased that this bill will also encourage the hiring of students graduating from minority-serving institutions.”

In a statement, the FAA said applicants for the position of Air Traffic Control Specialist-Trainee need to set-up an account on www.USAJobs.gov as soon as possible in order to apply for the highly competitive position.

“The agency expects more than 25,000 applications for approximately 1,400 positions during the seven-day job opening,” the statement read.

Good jobs are something black college grads across the nation are in short supply of. A 2014 study by the Center for Economic Policy Research revealed 12.4 percent of black college graduates between ages 22 – 27 are unemployed. For all college grads in the same age range the rate was 5.6 percent.

Over 20,000 FAA jobs will be open within the next three to five years across the country. Some of the positions including the air traffic controller role, pay upwards to $70,000 to $100,000 a year.

Air traffic controllers guide pilots, their planes and 2.2 million daily passengers from taxi to takeoff, through the air and back safely on the ground again. The FAA statement said air traffic controllers receive a wide range of training in controlling and separating live air traffic within designated airspace at and around an air traffic control tower, radar approach control facility, or air route traffic control center. 

“As a new ATCS, you will spend your first several months of employment in an intensive training program at the FAA Academy located in Oklahoma City,” the statement reads.

FAA Administrator Michael Huerta said in the newsletter the aviation authority “provides the safest, most efficient airspace system in the world and we need exceptional people to support our mission.”

Requirements for the job include being a U.S. citizen, being 31 or younger on Aug. 15, passing a medical examination, security investigation and the FAA air traffic pre-employment tests. Candidates must speak English clear enough to be understood over communications equipment and have three years of progressively responsible work experience or a Bachelor’s degree or a combination of post-secondary education and work experience that totals three years. Job inquirers must also be ready to move to an FAA facility based on agency staffing needs.

More Stability

In fact, air traffic controller is a career in the in-demand fields of accounting, business, computer science and engineering, which have lower unemployment rates. Glassdoor, a jobs and recruiting website, said plenty of top-notch jobs are appearing in the technology, finance and professional services industries.

Glassdoor and UC San Diego Extension recently conducted surveys that determined what the hottest jobs are based on career opportunities, base salary and open positions. The jobs listed included accountants, data scientist, human resource manager, marketing manager, nurse practitioner, software developers, market research analysts, and computer network architects.

Mary Walshok, associate vice chancellor of public programs and dean of UC San Diego Extension, said in a statement that the careers show both the value of a college degree and also the need for specialized training as technology is continuously reshaping the job market and the economy.

 “As Marc Andreessen recently opined, ‘Software is eating the world,'” Walshok said. “That fact is true in almost every top emerging career whether it be health care or marketing or financial analysis. It’s not enough to just know the fundamentals; you have to use technology to provide new insights.”

Board appoints CaSonya Thomas to lead Human Services

CaSonya Thomas, director of the Department of Behavioral Health

CaSonya Thomas, director of the Department of Behavioral Health

A director with 25 years of experience in meeting the social service and mental health needs of San Bernardino County residents was appointed on Tuesday by the Board of Supervisors to lead County Human Services.

CaSonya Thomas, director of the Department of Behavioral Health, will succeed Linda Haugan, who is retiring as Assistant Executive Officer of Human Services on Oct. 15 after more than 35 years of service to the County.

Haugan has spent the past 11 years as head of Human Services, a County agency that includes eight departments, more than 6,000 employees, and a $1.9 billion annual budget. Both Haugan and Thomas began their careers in what is now known as the Transitional Assistance Department as eligibility workers, an entry-level position in County Government. Thomas began her career in 1991.

Their careers illustrate the County’s successful efforts – mandated by the Board of Supervisors – to identify and develop talent from within the County organization, and ensure the County maintains a bench of qualified managers and executives to promote when vacancies occur. This practice will allow a nearly three-month transition for Thomas to work closely with Haugan before assuming her new role.

“It is an honor to receive this appointment, which comes with a tremendous responsibility to the people of San Bernardino County,” Thomas said. “Each day, Human Services changes lives through a number of programs and services, and we will remain committed to our Countywide Vision to build healthier communities by strengthening individuals and families, enhancing quality of life and valuing people.”

Thomas has held a number of positions within Human Services over the course of her 25-year County career, including Director of Behavioral Health and executive and management positions within Human Services. Under Thomas’ leadership, Behavioral Health played a key role in the County’s efforts to assist the survivors of the Dec. 2, 2015 terrorist attack in San Bernardino and the families of those who died.

“CaSonya Thomas is an outstanding employee and an asset to the county. As the newly appointed Assistant Executive Officer for Human Services, Ms. Thomas will bring professionalism and expertise that will continue to strengthen the County of San Bernardino,” said Board of Supervisors Chairman and Third District Supervisor James Ramos.

“CaSonya has proven herself as a successful and well-qualified leader for this position. Her experience, hard work and professionalism will serve our residents and the County well,” said Board of Supervisors Vice Chairman and First District Supervisor Robert Lovingood.

“It was a privilege to appoint Ms. Thomas as the Director of the Department of Behavioral Health in 2012, and I am thrilled to now support her appointment as the Assistant Executive Officer for Human Services,” said Fifth District Supervisor Josie Gonzales. “I am so pleased to see her succeed and I have no doubt she’ll continue to do a remarkable job.”

“CaSonya has consistently demonstrated her commitment to the well-being of all county residents,” said Second District Supervisor Janice Rutherford. “Her intelligence, compassion and creativity are perfectly suited to the challenges we face.”

Haugan assumed the reins of Human Services in July 2005 after an already-notable career that included the implementation of the landmark C-IV Statewide Automated Welfare System. Her first order of business as Humans Services chief was to successfully and dramatically reduce the County’s food stamp error rate.

Throughout her tenure, Haugan has fostered collaboration between Human Services departments to improve services to the public, a practice that has made the County a consistent leader in winning national and state awards for innovative and effective programs.

“I have had the good fortune of working with many talented people who carry out their public service mission with passion and intelligence. That’s why I feel I am leaving Human Services in a very good state and in very good hands,” Haugan said.

Thomas has a bachelor’s degree in business administration and a post-graduate degree in public administration, both from California State University, San Bernardino. She is also certified in healthcare compliance by the national Health Care Compliance Association.

Thomas serves as president-elect to the County Behavioral Health Directors Association of California (CBHDA), whose goals include advocating and developing public policy agendas that support access to necessary quality services that promote behavioral health and wellness, and resiliency and recovery in communities. She also is co-chair of the CBHDA Cultural Competence, Equity and Social Justice Committee.

Human Services departments, divisions and offices include Aging and Adult Services, Animal Care and Control, Behavioral Health, Child Support Services, Children and Family Services, Children’s Network, Environmental Health Services, Homeless Services, Preschool Services, Public Health, Transitional Assistance and Veterans Affairs.