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Author Archives: WSS News

University STEM Academy Health Presentations and Graduation Luncheon

RIVERSIDE, CA- You and your family are cordially invited to join us at the Third Graduation of the University STEM Academy (USA). USA provides Mathematic and Science enrichment activities for predominantly African American students in Grades 6 through 9. Our scholars will be presenting at the 3rd Annual Black Health Expo, which will take place on Saturday, February 18, from 9:00am until 2:00pm, on the University of California, Riverside campus. This event will be held in Room 302 of the Highland Union Building, better known as the HUB.

The scholars will be presenting a workshop entitled: Future African American Medical Professionals: The Engineering of Bio Medical Devices from 10:00am to 11:00am. The luncheon and graduation will take place between 11:00am and 1:00pm. The Expo, the luncheon, and parking are free (Lot #1).

Besides the scholars’ presentations, the following will be available at the event: Health screening vendors, Community resources, Yoga exercise, Workshops, Food, door prizes, and a lot more.

On Saturday, October 1, 2016, the University STEM Academy (USA) registered 40 African American male and female scholars. The theme this academic year was Quality Health for All. We are training our students to be aware of the gold standard of knowledge (i.e., best practices to maintain health and cure disease). Also, scholars are being taught to understand how physical and mental trauma impact the human body. Moreover, the scholars are training to lead the charge, by sharing health values with their families, classmates, and the surrounding community, you!

Dr. Victor Rodgers (Bio-Engineer) and Dr. Prashanthi “Shanthi” Vandrangi (Bio-Engineer) are the Resident Scientists. Mr. Brandon Copeland is the Resident Mathematician, and Ms. Darling Paul-Richiez, a Registered Nurse, Researcher, and Certified Public Health Educator is the Mini-Medical School Dean and Coordinator. The Black Health Expo will spotlight various aspects of what the scholars has been learning to-date.

Your presence will let our scholars know they are supported, and what they are learning is both worthwhile and appreciated. This event is open to the public, so please share this invitation with family and friends.

For further information, please email me at carolyn.murray@ucr.edu.

Remembering the First African-American Teacher in San Bernardino County: Dorothy Ella Inghram

Dorothy Inghram

Dorothy Inghram

SAN BERNARDINO, CA- In celebration of Black History Month, San Bernardino Valley College remembers Hall of Fame alumna Dorothy Ella Inghram, class of 1932: the first African-American teacher in San Bernardino County, composer of SBVC’s Alma Mater, and one of Southern California’s most iconic educators.

Dorothy was born in 1905 on 6th Street in San Bernardino. Her father, Henry, worked as a custodian in the Opera House on Court Street?—?one of the many places African Americans weren’t allowed to attend.

Dorothy began school at Mt. Vernon Elementary in 1911. She later attended Sturges Junior High School and San Bernardino High School, becoming one of 123 students. Music played an important role in Dorothy’s life. While attending San Bernardino Valley College from 1928 through 1933, Dorothy wrote the music for the hymn that was selected as the college’s Alma Mater.

Dorothy earned an elementary teaching credential in 1939 after student teaching at an East Highlands school, and in 1942, Dorothy was hired to teach second grade at Mill School?—?the first African-American teacher in San Bernardino County.

Three years later, she became a teaching principal?—?splitting her duties between the classroom and administration?—?and became a full-time principal in 1951, a job she thoroughly enjoyed.

Dorothy was promoted to District Superintendent of Mill School District in 1953?—?the first African-American in the state of California to hold that position, and somehow also found time to earn a masters degree in education from the University of Redlands in 1958.

In 1977, one of San Bernardino’s library branches (on the corner of Highland and Western Ave.) was named for her.

At the age of 97, Dorothy received an honorary doctorate degree from Cal State San Bernardino. She authored five books over the course of her lifetime: Dear MegImproving the Services of Substitute TeachersBeyond All This,Incredible You and What’s on Your Mind?

In Beyond All This, Dorothy documents her family’s drive and determination to succeed during a time when blacks were not considered an integral part of the community. She recalls how her parents stressed that their children not carry any bitterness because of the racial tension around them, emphasizing the importance of education and following their own ambitions in order to become successful.

In 1989, Dorothy was inducted into San Bernardino Valley College’s Alumni Hall of Fame.

“San Bernardino Valley College provided the opportunity for me to pursue the professional career which I thoroughly enjoyed for 30 years,” Dorothy said. “For this, I shall always be grateful.”

Dorothy passed away in 2012 at the age of 106.


 

Sources:

Black History Facts: Part I

Garrett Augustus Morgan

Garrett Augustus Morgan

TRAFFIC SIGNAL: Garrett Augustus Morgan (March 4, 1877 – August 27, 1963), was an African-American inventor and businessman. He was the first person to patent a traffic signal. He also developed the gas mask (and many other inventions). Morgan used his gas mask (patent No. 1,090,936, 1914) to rescue miners who were trapped underground in a noxious mine. Soon after, Morgan was asked to produce gas masks for the US Army.

RILLIEUX, NORBERT: Norbert Rillieux (March 17, 1806-October 8, 1894) was an African-American inventor and engineer who invented a device that revolutionized sugar processing. Rillieux’s multiple effect vacuum sugar evaporator (patented in 1864) made the processing of sugar more efficient, faster, and much safer. The resulting sugar was also superior. His apparatus was eventually adopted by sugar processing plants all around the world.

POTATO CHIPS: The potato chip was invented in 1853 by George Crum. Crum was a Native American/African American chef at the Moon Lake Lodge resort in Saratoga Springs, New York, USA. French fries were popular at the restaurant and one day a diner complained that the fries were too thick. Although Crum made a thinner batch, the customer was still unsatisfied. Crum finally made fries that were too thin to eat with a fork, hoping to annoy the extremely fussy customer. The customer, surprisingly enough, was happy – and potato chips were invented!