Home / Bottom Line (page 2)

Bottom Line

Police Maintain Black Killing Tradition!

Publisher’s Commentary by Wallace J. Allen

Another Black man killed by police. At the time of this writing, the dead Black man I am talking about has possibly or probably been joined by another. At first thought I felt that I should honor the dead by naming them; however, my long-term thought is that by naming them I am trivializing the overriding long-term issue that Black men are a police target in America regardless of their name rank or serial number.  The only group that kills more Black men than police is, of course, Black men.

The obvious question is, why Black people get mad enough to riot in the streets when police kill a Black man, yet, though angered by Black-on-Black killing, there is not the display of anger and frustration that occurs with a police shooting.

For those who really are possessed by that question, let me give you the obvious answer.  Police shootings reflect the final attitude of a society that displays its fear and distain for Black males at first social sight. From Pre-school, Black males are disproportionately identified as troublemakers and treated that way regardless of name, rank and serial number. That is documented in the number of school detentions and discipline referrals handed to Black boys. The disproportionate unemployment and incarceration rates for Black males reflect the penalty for the Black male that refuses to “play ball” in the “change the rules anytime” game that marginal Black Males are restricted to.

We Blacks know that many of our young gangsters are a result of customs and laws that push Black families apart. Laws that remove the parental power of discipline that ultimately marginalize and compromise the value of young black lives. So, we understand and are thoroughly pained by Black on Black crime, and in general attribute it to self-hate generated by America’s long-term love-affair with racism. Thus, the shootings done by the police are the “final straw” acts that activate the “time to raise hell button” in Black Communities.

I, like many of you, look forward to when we who promote good over evil are able to provide enough protection and access to resources, opportunity and guidance for our children to truly empower them to excellence despite racism.

 

African-American’s Buying Power Projected to be $1.1 Trillion by 2015…

Is AA Consumerism a tool for improving AA quality of life?

Should African-Americans use their communal spending power (one trillion dollars plus annually, Nielson Co.) to influence how corporations and small local businesses treat them? Jobs and contracts for services could be a goal of negotiating consumer support for one company instead of another. My focus is on providing support for businesses that you like because of how they treat your community, as well as realizing the power of “selective spending”, when done by a group.

It is common knowledge that the more units that one purchases, the greater the potential discount. Think about “fleet sales” in the auto business or insurance for a group that represents the million, plus people in your national religious and social organizations. Think about the development power of a one thousand people (we have churches larger than that) whom each pledge to spend $50 a month with a small business. Choosing the business each month could be based on shared economic and social values. I would be concerned about hiring practices and general support/giving back to the community.  Local small businesses would be elated to receive that business support.

So two thoughts, first consider the national power that could be generated by focusing/negotiating one trillion dollars for increased delivery of products and services as well as jobs and contracts, and second, create small spending focus groups designed to empower small businesses that help train and employ our children as well as support community activities. Let’s talk about it. Email me at walleniv@yahoo.com.

 

African Global Economic & Development Summit

BOTTOMLINE: Publisher’s Commentary…By Wallace J. Allen

If you are a business person, you are possibly able to supply a service or product to one of the countries in Africa. Africa is host to six of the top ten fastest growing economies in the world! Almost all goods are imported in Africa. You do not have to manufacture in order to be a supplier. You can learn the export process and meet people that you can do business with by attending the Summit.

Africa is looking for American companies to do business with; for example, there is a 7 billion dollar funding initiative to help double power generation capacity in Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Liberia, Nigeria, and Tanzania, which includes oil and gas funding support in Uganda and Mozambique.

The African Global Economic & Development Summit 2014 is featuring the following industries: Power Generation; Mining; Renewable Energy; Oil and Gas; Bio Fuels; Finance; Agriculture; Telecommunications; Building Construction and Development; Environmental Remediation; Medical Facilities; Education; Public Works; Hospitality; and Wastewater Treatment.

If you are interested in doing business in Africa, you are encouraged to attend the summit on Thursday, August 7 at 7 a.m. to Saturday, August 9 at 5 p.m. The event will be held at the University of Southern California (USC)/ (Hedco Auditorium – Seeley G. Mudd Building) located at3620 McClintock Avenue in Los Angeles (90089). Use entrance 6 off of Vermont Avenue and 36th Place.

For more information, call Mary Flowers at (909) 396-5141.