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Publisher and Co-Founder of California Black Media Hardy Brown Honored at State Senate

Hardy Brown is honored on the floor of the California State Senate. Included in this photo from left to right: (back row) son-in-law and Stockton City Manager Kurt Wilson, granddaughter Kennedy Wilson, brother Vince Brown; (middle row) daughter and California Black Media chair Regina Brown Wilson, wife Assemblymember Cheryl Brown (D-San Bernardino); (front row) Senator Richard Roth (D-Riverside), Senator Connie Leyva (D-Chino), Hardy Brown, and Senator Mike Morrell (R-Rancho Cucamonga).

Hardy Brown is honored on the floor of the California State Senate. Included in this photo from left to right: (back row) son-in-law and Stockton City Manager Kurt Wilson, granddaughter Kennedy Wilson, brother Vince Brown; (middle row) daughter and California Black Media chair Regina Brown Wilson, wife Assemblymember Cheryl Brown (D-San Bernardino); (front row) Senator Richard Roth (D-Riverside), Senator Connie Leyva (D-Chino), Hardy Brown, and Senator Mike Morrell (R-Rancho Cucamonga).

SACRAMENTO – In recognition of his work in the community and role in the California media industry, Senators Mike Morrell, R-Rancho Cucamonga, and Connie Leyva, D-Chino, presented Black Voice News publisher and California Black Media co-founder Hardy Brown, Sr. with a Senate resolution on Monday.
“Hardy’s life story is an inspiring one,” said Morrell. “The Black Voice News is an important news outlet in our region and provides valuable insight to its readers every week. But as much as Hardy and his wife Cheryl are known for their contributions to the publishing industry they are also generous philanthropists. They do incredible work on behalf of kids and families in neighborhoods across the Inland Empire. We are fortunate to have them as leaders in our community.”
The son of North Carolina sharecroppers, Brown came to California in the 1960s and held various positions with Kaiser and the California Electric Company (now Southern California Edison). In 1980, he and his wife Cheryl, now an Assemblymember representing the 47th District, founded Brown Publishing Company to produce the Black Voice News, a newspaper focusing on local news in Riverside and San Bernardino counties. Together, they have the distinction of being the only living publishers to be included in the 175th anniversary of the Black Press of America.
Brown is also founding President of California Black Media, a network of African-American media owners across California, which will meet in Sacramento this week during the annual conference of the California Newspaper Publishers Association.
“I’m truly humbled to be honored by Senators Mike Morrell and Connie Leyva during Black History Month, and am deeply appreciative of the graciousness displayed by the entire Senate body,” said Brown. “As the son of a poor-sharecropper from North Carolina, I never imagined that I’d be here today in front of you all, partaking in the American Dream. Words cannot fully express my appreciation. Thank you to my family, friends, community and employers who all believed in me and supported me over the past 50 years. I’ve dedicated my life to community service. This honor is a strong testament to the power of God and what he can do with someone who believes in Him.”
Over a decade ago, Hardy was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig’s disease, also known as ALS, but the disease has not defined his life at all. He has fought it courageously and continues to write a regular column or Black Voice News on today’s issues of importance.

Child Abduction Unit reunites three children with their father

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Augustus Scott pictured with his three children, following their return to California.

SAN BERNARDINO, CA- The San Bernardino County District Attorney’s Child Abduction Unit (CAU) assisted in the successful reunification of three young children with their father Jan. 30, after their non-custodial, biological mother removed them from their home and fled California.

According to Senior Investigator Karen Cragg, who is assigned to the case, Cari Ann Gleason withheld the three children from their biological father, 57-year-old Augustus Scott, of Victorville, without his consent, since Nov. 2014. After a lengthy investigation, the children were located in the State of Florida.

On January 30, 2015, investigators from the Child Abduction Unit traveled to Daytona Beach, Florida, where by prearrangement, 33-year-old Gleason voluntarily placed the children with the investigators for return to Scott in California. Upon their return to San Bernardino County the next day, the children were immediately reunited with their father.

“No matter how many times we do this, it’s always gratifying to reunite a child, or, as in this case, children, with their legal parent or guardian and ensure that the court’s child custody orders are followed,” Cragg said.

The work of the CAU focuses on protecting the custody rights of parents and legal guardians.  On a routine basis, the CAU partners with courts and law enforcement throughout the United States to recover abducted children who are carried across state lines. In cases of international child abduction, the CAU implements the terms of the Hague Convention, an international treaty signed by more than 60 countries.

For more information regarding the Child Abduction Unit, please visit: http://ow.ly/AS6cr

San Bernardino County Museum brings artifacts onto the Google Cultural Institute

Google Cultural Institute-132224The San Bernardino County Museum in Redlands, California today announced it is adding high resolution images to the Google Cultural Institute allowing people across the United States to explore its collections online. The images will go online on February 10.

Native American baskets and pottery from the museum’s ethnology collections were selected to become part of the Google Cultural Institute. The resolution of these images, combined with a custom built zoom viewer, allows everyone from art-lovers anthropologists to discover details of objects they may never have seen up close before.

“We are delighted to join the Google Cultural Institute to make some of our collections accessible to a wider public,” said Leonard Hernandez, the museum’s interim director. “The artifacts that will be available for study and enjoyment through this project will expand many viewers’ perceptions of ‘art.’ These Native American baskets will be joined by examples of other aspects of the museum collections, including some beautiful mineral specimens that could be seen as Nature’s works of art.”

Visitors to the Google Cultural Institute can browse works by the artist’s name, the artwork, the type of art, the museum, the country, collections and the time period. Google+ and video hangouts are integrated on the site, allowing viewers to invite their friends to view and discuss their favorite works in a video chat or follow a guided tour from an expert.

The ‘My Gallery’ feature allows users to save specific views of any of artworks or artifacts and build their own personalized gallery. Comments can be added to each object and the whole gallery can then be shared with friends and family. It’s an ideal tool for students or groups to work on collaborative projects or collections. In addition, a feature called ‘Compare’ allows you to examine two pieces side-by-side to look at how styles evolved over time, connect trends across cultures, or delve deeply into two parts of the same work.

The Google Cultural Institute is dedicated to creating technology that helps the cultural community to bring their art, archives, heritage sites and other material online. The aim is to increase the range and volume of material from the cultural world that is available for people to explore online and in doing so, democratize access to it and preserve it for future generations.