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Breast cancer survivors to show off latest fashions at 6th annual ‘The Pink Runway’ Breast Cancer Reconstruction Seminar and Fashion Show

LOMA LINDA, CA-Breast cancer survivors will show current styles and fashions, while specialists will present the latest medical information and advances, as Loma Linda University Health System Department of Plastic Surgery presents the 6th annual “The Pink Runway” Breast Cancer Reconstruction Seminar and Fashion Show on Sunday, September 28.

The event starts at noon at Riverside Convention Center, 3637 5th St, Riverside, Calif. Tickets are from $35 to $45 each and may be purchased online at www.ThePinkRunway.com.

Building on success over the years, organizers promise a day of inspiration and empowerment with an all-new format. There will be exciting educational seminars preceding the inspiring fashion show featuring breast cancer survivors as the models showcasing apparel provided by Chico’s.

“We are very proud to ensure all women are educated on their reconstructive options post-mastectomy, which is the main goal of the Pink Runway event,” said Dr. Subhas Gupta, chairman of Loma Linda University Health System Department of Plastic Surgery.

“We believe it is critical to educate women with breast cancer about their reconstructive surgery options because of the positive impact of reconstructive surgery on them. I am very pleased to report that research supported by the Pink Runway and my department has found a 41 percent increase in the rate of breast cancer reconstruction in our Inland Empire community over the past 5 years since we began holding this educational event,” he said.

The agenda for the event includes “Pink Carpet” arrivals and photos, silent auction, opportunity drawings, video tribute to breast cancer survivors, delicious cancer-fighting food samples, and prizes.

The event will also feature Daniel and Shawna Head, owners and instructors of The Yoga Room, who will present exercise, yoga, and relaxation techniques to reduce anxiety, depression, and fatigue; and Robin Allen, founder of The Necessary Nutrition Academy, who will lead a session entitled “Key Nutrition Secrets and Superfoods Revealed!”

For more information please call (909) 558-5566.

Community Police Academy

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SAN BERNARDINO, CA- The San Bernardino Police Department is currently accepting reservations for the next Community Police Academy. This is an eight-week program designed to give participants an inside look at local law enforcement. The program is designed to form a stronger partnership between the community and the Police Department through education. Participants will be exposed to a variety of topics, such as: Criminal investigations; Crime analysis and crime mapping; Gang enforcement; Traffic laws and enforcement; Animal Control; Community Policing and many more. Course material will be presented by Police Department administrators and veteran department staff. Participants will also have an opportunity to meet the Chief of Police, where they are encouraged to ask questions.  Enrollment is limited to 50 students per class. Potential candidates must live or work in the City of San Bernardino.

Classes will meet in the Police Department’s main training room, 710 N. “D” Street, on Wednesday evenings 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., for eight consecutive weeks.  Free parking will be provided to the front of the police station as well as on adjoining streets.   The Fall Academy will begin Wednesday, September, 24, and continue through graduation on Wednesday, November 12.

The Citizen’s Academy is a great way to learn about your community, meet nice people, and get to know the men and women of your police department.  For more information, contact Community Affairs at (909) 384-5753 or by e-mail, communityaffairs@sbcity.org.

Stanford scholar named MacArthur fellow

Jennifer Eberhardt says the MacArthur fellowship will allow her to expand her research on race and the criminal justice system. (Photo: John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation)

Jennifer Eberhardt says the MacArthur fellowship will allow her to expand her research on race and the criminal justice system. (Photo: John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation)

Stanford’s Jennifer Eberhardt has been named one of the 2014 fellows of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. A social psychologist, she studies the racial elements in the perceptions of crime.

BY CLIFTON B. PARKER

Stanford psychologist Jennifer Eberhardt, who studies race and the law, has been named one of the 2014 fellows of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

The fellowships, given to scholars for their achievement and potential, include a $625,000 stipend over five years. The honors rank among the most prestigious prizes in academia and the creative arts. They are sometimes referred to as the “genius” awards.

“I feel it gives me the space to pursue my research with new energy and motivation,” Eberhardt said. “It reaffirms how important the issues of race and inequality are in the legal system.”

When the foundation initially contacted her to inform her that she was named a fellow, Eberhardt was overwhelmed.

“I had no inkling, no idea they were considering me. It felt like a pivotal moment in my life.”

When the awards were publicly announced Tuesday night, Eberhardt received numerous calls and emails from colleagues, friends and family. “I think I had only a couple hours of sleep,” she chuckled. Thursday promised to be even busier – in addition to the MacArthur media inquiries, she was due to give two different presentations on racial disparities to the U.S. Department of Justice.

“But I feel good and have the energy,” Eberhardt said. “I’ll keep doing what I’m doing.”

Joined Stanford in 1998

Since she arrived on campus in 1998, Eberhardt has examined the role that racial stereotypes play in the criminalization of African-Americans. She joined the Stanford faculty after teaching at Yale University, and is currently an associate professor in psychology and co-director of SPARQ, a university initiative that addresses social problems.

Her colleague Greg Walton, a Stanford assistant professor of psychology, said that Eberhardt’s research has vital social significance. “In helping understand our minds, Jennifer’s research helps us see the kinds of changes we need to make in society to help give all people a fair shot,” he said.

A first-generation college graduate from Cleveland, Ohio, Eberhardt said that her parents instilled in her a love of education. She witnessed the disparity in education in the different neighborhoods where she grew up, and soon fell in love with learning. Her late father, Harlan, a postal mail worker, “understood the power of education,” she said.

And her late mother, Mary, was inspired enough by her daughter’s collegiate success – she earned a doctorate from Harvard – to go to college herself at midlife.

“Education is transformational,” Eberhardt said.

Expanding research

Now, the MacArthur fellowship will greatly expand her research plans and resources to connect with real-world policy. “I hope to work with more law enforcement agencies and do things off the beaten path,” Eberhardt said, noting that she’s currently engaged with the Oakland Police Department on the analysis of racial profiling data. “Many of the (law enforcement) agencies collect the data but often don’t know what to do with it,” she said.

As Eberhardt pointed out, although African-Americans constitute only 12 percent of America’s population, they represent 40 percent of the nation’s prison inmates.

Her statistical analysis has shown that police officers are more likely to identify African-American faces than white faces as criminal. In one experimental study, people who were exposed to black faces were then more likely to identify a blurry image as a gun than those who were exposed to white faces or no faces.

Eberhardt plans to combine social psychological insights with technology to improve outcomes in the criminal justice context and elsewhere.

“I’m hopeful to bring about real social change,” she said.