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Loma Linda University Launches Diagnostic Medical Sonography Bachelor’s Degree

LOMA LINDA, CA- Loma Linda University’s School of Allied Health Professions has introduced a bachelor’s degree in diagnostic medical sonography, expanding the program from a certificate degree to meet the needs of the industry that is increasingly seeking graduates of a four-year program.

Applications are now being taken for the program’s first bachelor’s degree co-hort. The priority deadline to apply is October 15, with a final deadline of December 15.

Medical sonography, commonly known as ultrasound scanning, is a diagnostic medical procedure that uses high frequency sound waves to produce dynamic visual images of organs, tissues, or blood flow inside the body. Unlike X-rays, sonography is a radiation-free imaging modality.

Sonography is often used to examine many parts of the body, such as the abdomen, breasts, obstetrics & gynecology, prostate, heart and blood vessels. Sonography is increasingly being used in the detection and treatment of heart disease and vascular disease that can lead to a stroke. It is also used to guide fine-needle tissue biopsies. 

A sonographer may provide this service in a variety of medical settings where the physician is responsible for the use and interpretation of ultrasound procedures. Sonographers assist physicians in gathering sonographic data necessary to reach diagnostic decisions.

“This is such a rewarding field,” said Marie DeLange, program director for diagnostic medical sonography at Loma Linda University’s School of Allied Health Professions.

“There is great satisfaction and reward to be able to use critical thinking skills in partnering with physicians to determine a diagnosis to better care for the patient.”  

Loma Linda University’s diagnostic medical sonography degree is a 27-month program, approximately 80 percent of which is classroom coursework and 20 percent completed online. Students spend more than 30 hours a week in a clinical setting. Classes are held once a week for 2 to 5 hours.

Loma Linda University also offers a cardiac sonography certificate, which involves more in-depth study of the heart, including heart hemodynamics, normal anatomy, disease processes and patient treatment.

The cardiac sonography certificate program begins each autumn, and the program length is 12-months. This program prepares students to sit for the board exam and RDCS credentialing exam. All students are required to take and pass the ARDMS Standard Physics and Instrumentation (SPI) exam before completion of the program.

Sonography is a good fit for a career…

  • If you want to work in a fast-paced, satisfying career in the medical field…
  • If you seek a significant role on the health care team to help in patient diagnosis…
  • If you desire more responsibility, working closely with physicians.

The sonography programs at Loma Linda University offer:

  • A variety of clinical sites with extensive clinical hours…
  • A broad exposure to patient cases…
  • A unique student experience with experienced faculty who care about you…
  • A learning environment that supports and motivates you toward your success.

This news release follows last month’s announcement that the school has also expanded its nuclear medicine certificate into a bachelor’s degree.

“We continue to offer newly expanded programs so our students — and their future employers — will receive the greatest possible benefit for serving patients,” said Laura Alipoon, EdD, RT, chair of the school’s Department of Radiation Technology. “We look forward to announcing more expanded programs soon.”

Medical sonography, commonly known as ultrasound scanning, is a diagnostic medical procedure that uses high frequency sound waves to produce dynamic visual images of organs, tissues, or blood flow inside the body. Unlike X-rays, sonography is a radiation-free imaging modality.

Sonography is often used to examine many parts of the body, such as the abdomen, breasts, obstetrics & gynecology, prostate, heart and blood vessels. Sonography is increasingly being used in the detection and treatment of heart disease and vascular disease that can lead to a stroke. It is also used to guide fine-needle tissue biopsies. 

A sonographer may provide this service in a variety of medical settings where the physician is responsible for the use and interpretation of ultrasound procedures. Sonographers assist physicians in gathering sonographic data necessary to reach diagnostic decisions.

“This is such a rewarding field,” said Marie DeLange, program director for diagnostic medical sonography at Loma Linda University’s School of Allied Health Professions. “There is great satisfaction and reward to be able to use critical thinking skills in partnering with physicians to determine a diagnosis to better care for the patient.”  

Loma Linda University’s diagnostic medical sonography degree is a 27-month program, approximately 80 percent of which is classroom coursework and 20 percent completed online. Students spend more than 30 hours a week in a clinical setting. Classes are held once a week for 2 to 5 hours.

Loma Linda University also offers a cardiac sonography certificate, which involves more in-depth study of the heart, including heart hemodynamics, normal anatomy, disease processes and patient treatment.

The cardiac sonography certificate program begins each autumn, and the program length is 12-months. This program prepares students to sit for the board exam and RDCS credentialing exam. All students are required to take and pass the ARDMS Standard Physics and Instrumentation (SPI) exam before completion of the program.

Sonography is a good fit for a career…

  • If you want to work in a fast-paced, satisfying career in the medical field…
  • If you seek a significant role on the health care team to help in patient diagnosis…
  • If you desire more responsibility, working closely with physicians.

The sonography programs at Loma Linda University offer:

  • A variety of clinical sites with extensive clinical hours…
  • A broad exposure to patient cases…
  • A unique student experience with experienced faculty who care about you…
  • A learning environment that supports and motivates you toward your success.

This news release follows last month’s announcement that the school has also expanded its nuclear medicine certificate into a bachelor’s degree.

“We continue to offer newly expanded programs so our students — and their future employers — will receive the greatest possible benefit for serving patients,” said Laura Alipoon, EdD, RT, chair of the school’s Department of Radiation Technology. “We look forward to announcing more expanded programs soon.”

Loma Linda University Cancer Center Now Offers Low Dose CT Scan for Lung Cancer

LOMA LINDA, CA Loma Linda University (LLU) Cancer Center is now offering lung cancer screening through a low dose chest CT scan.

The leading cause of cancer deaths in the U.S., and the second most common form of cancer in both men and women, lung cancer typically goes undetected until symptoms present, which is usually in the latter stages of the disease, according to Brian S. Furukawa, MD, assistant professor of pulmonary and critical care at LLU School of Medicine.

“Not only can we now detect lung cancer at an early stage when it is curable, but with our multi-disciplinary approach our team can help patients modify his or her risk factors,” Furukawa said. “The most important thing you can do to decrease your risk of getting lung cancer is to quit smoking.”

CT, or computed tomography, is an imaging procedure that uses special X-ray equipment to create detailed pictures or scans of areas inside the body. CT images of internal organs, bones, soft tissue and blood vessels typically provide greater detail than traditional X-rays.

A recent study comparing yearly screening with a low dose chest CT versus chest X-ray showed a 20 percent reduction in mortality in patients at high risk for lung cancer. 

Although getting a CT scan is relatively quick and easy, screening is an individual choice. The Lung Cancer Screening clinic educates patients on the risks and benefits of screening to help them decide on which is best for them. The clinic also works with patients to help them quit smoking. In addition, if a scan reveals a concerning finding, a multi-disciplinary team of specialists is ready to discuss the next best steps to take for further work up and a treatment plan if cancer is detected. 

“There is a dedicated team to provide care at every level to our patients,” Furukawa said. 

To learn more about low dose CT for lung cancer, or to see if you are eligible, visit lomalindalung.org or call 1-800-78-CANCER.

 

San Bernardino Native Helps Keep One of The Navy’s Newest, Most Advanced Aircraft Flying

Danyelle Ridley

Danyelle Ridley

By Chief Petty Officer Bill Steele, Navy Office of Community Outreach

A 2013 Pacific High School graduate and San Bernadino, California native is serving with a U.S. Navy strike fighter squadron that flies one of the Navy’s newest and most technologically-advanced aircraft, the F/A-18 E/F Super Hornet.

Petty Officer 3rd Class Danyielle Ridley is an aviation structural mechanic with the “Flying Eagles” of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 122 “Super Hornets”, stationed in Lemoore, California. The squadron is currently training at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Washington.

As an aviation structural mechanic, Ridley is responsible for repairing the structure the jet aircraft and changing the hydraulic components.

“I enjoy anything with hydraulics,” said Ridley. “I think it’s interesting how it works. I never knew anything about hydraulics until I joined the Navy.”

The F/A-18 Hornet, an all-weather aircraft, is used as an attack aircraft as well as a fighter. In its fighter mode, it is used primarily as a fighter escort and for fleet air defense; in its attack mode, it is used for force projection, interdiction and close and deep air support, according to Navy sources.

The newest model, Super Hornet, is highly capable across the full mission spectrum: air superiority, fighter escort, reconnaissance, aerial refueling, close air support, air defense suppression and day or night precision strike. Compared to the original aircraft, according to Navy officials, Super Hornet has longer range, an aerial refueling capability, increased survivability and improved carrier suitability.

“I like that this is a training command—it gives us lots of room to learn,” said Ridley.

As a member of one of the Navy’s squadrons with the newest aircraft platforms, Ridley and other VFA-122 sailors are proud to be part of a warfighting team that readily defends America at all times.

Sailors’ jobs are highly varied at VFA-122, according to Navy officials. Since the squadron is the 10th largest in the world, with over 100 aircraft operating, sailors must make up and keep all parts of the squadron running smoothly — this includes everything from maintaining airframes and engines, to processing paperwork, handling weaponry, and flying the aircraft. 

Serving in the Navy, Ridley is learning about being a more responsible leader, sailor and citizen through handling numerous responsibilities.

“I first joined the Navy just to get education, but something about it makes me want to do it forever,” Ridley added. “It’s never boring at work, it’s not repetitive. Jets are exciting.”