Home / Local (page 9)

Local

Lecture on Importance of Physical Activity Among Youth at CSUSB

SAN BERNARDINO, CA – The department of kinesiology at Cal State San Bernardino will host a free lecture by Karin A. Pfeiffer, professor of kinesiology at Michigan State University and an expert on physical activity, on Monday, March 3.

The lecture, “Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans Midcourse Report,” will be from 9:20-10:30 a.m. in CSUSB’s Panorama Room in the Lower Commons. The lecture is open to everyone, particularly students and faculty of kinesiology, staff and the public. Parking is $5 per vehicle.

Pfeiffer, who is also a member of MSU’s Center for Physical Activity and Health, will focus on the report’s strategies to increase physical activity among youth. Her research includes physical activity assessments in children as well as interventions designed to increase physical activity levels among young children.

An exercise physiologist with an interest in population-based investigations, Pfeiffer’s research focuses on two major areas: measurement of physical activity and interventions to increase physical activity in children and adolescents, spanning preschool through high school age.

Her expertise has included many school-based studies and she is interested in incorporating families and communities into her research.

The Center for Physical Activity and Health at Michigan State University was founded in 2004 as a collaborative project between the departments of kinesiology and epidemiology. The purpose of CPAH is to study the effect of physical activity on human health and well-being throughout a life span, while developing appropriate physical activity intervention strategies.

Pfeiffer’s work is relevant to the public health perspective related to low levels of activity and the increased risk of obesity in American children.

She is currently president-elect of the North American Society for Pediatric Exercise Medicine and a fellow and trustee for the American College of Sports Medicine.

The lecture is co-sponsored by CSUSB’s Intellectual Life and Visiting Scholars Committee. For more information about the lecture, contact Shannon Siegel at (909) 537-5358 or email ssiegel@csusb.edu.

For more information about Cal State San Bernardino, contact the university’s Office of Public Affairs at (909) 537-5007 and visit news.csusb.edu.

Career Information Day For Workability Students Set For March 1

REDLANDS – The 15th annual Career Information Day, hosted by the Colton-Redlands-Yucaipa Regional Occupational Program (CRY-ROP), will be held on March 7.

The event will feature exhibits and presentations for workability students. It will be held from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the CRY-ROP office at 1214 Indiana Court in Redlands.

The event is co-sponsored by the East Valley Special Education Local Plan Area (SELPA) Transition Partnership Project, the California Department of Rehabilitation and Workability and the following educational agencies: Colton Joint Unified School District, Redlands Unified, Rialto Unified, Rim of the World Unified, Yucaipa-Calimesa Joint Unified and San Bernardino County Superintendent of Schools.

The event is not open to the public; only to students in the participating programs.

About 30 local participating employers have committed to attend the event. They represent occupations from childcare services to youth recreation, as well as clerical, medical, restaurant, retail and warehouse occupations.

There will be drawings for prizes donated by employers, as well as a student/employer lunch.

For more information on the event, contact Helen Junker at the East Valley SELPA Transition Partnership Project at (909) 252-4514.

With Black Community Awareness of Obamacare Benefits Falling Short of Expectations

McKenzie Jackson, California Black Media

McKenzie Jackson, California Black Media

California advocates and consumers urge renewed effort and focus

By McKenzie Jackson, California Black Media

Last May, Covered California, the state’s health insurance marketplace,  announced the awarding of $37 million in grants that would flow to a total of nearly 300 organizations, all working to conduct outreach and develop tailored education plans about affordable health care coverage available through the state exchange.

Targeting a total of 9 million Californians, 32 grants were said to be focused on African-American outreach, compared to 37 targeting Latinos. Twenty-seven grants were focused on Caucasian outreach and education, with 20 aimed at the Asian-Pacific Islander community.

These efforts are widely perceived to have been in good faith. But with so few African-Americans enrolled in Obamacare benefits through the state exchange questions linger about the effectiveness of the outreach. As of last month, only about 11,000 blacks were on the Covered California rolls, representing about 3.1 percent of enrollees, despite numbering seven percent of the state’s total population..

“We definitely need to increase the outreach to African-Americans,” said Karen D. Lincoln, a professor of social work at the University of Southern California and founder of the organization Advocates for African-American Elders. “I think the fact that the primary method of enrollment is via the Internet, there is a large segment of our population who cannot enroll. Now, among the general population of African-Americans, there is certainly more use of social media, but access can be a problem.

Advocates are now stepping in to help boost the effectiveness of the outreach. For example, The California Endowment, in partnership with DHCS, has launched a $23 million statewide effort to boost Medi-Cal enrollment in 36 counties across the state.

Considering the numbers, those efforts appear to be worthwhile. According to Covered California, as of 2013 there were 8.5 million Californians enrolled in Medi-Cal. Thanks to Obamacare, up to two million more residents of are expected to be eligible this year, with a significant percentage of those potential enrolleesbelieved to be African-American.

Thomas Duncan, CEO of Trusted Health Plan, a Washington D.C.-based managed healthcare organization, argues that African-Americans are poised to be among the chief benefactors of the healthcare law. In an article entitled “African-Americans will benefit greatly from Obamacare,” published February 6 in the International Business Times, Duncan wrote that a disproportionate percentage of blacks will become newly eligible for health coverage.

“Prior to the Affordable Care Act, our nation’s healthcare system was discriminatory to both lower- and middle-wage workers,” he wrote. “But now, Obamacare opens the door to preventive, primary, and strategic specialty care for millions of African-Americans and others.”

“Black people, we need that,” said Joseph Thomas, a 31-year-old Woodland Hills resident. He estimates that the Covered California plan he recently obtained online with his domestic partner would save their household about $1,200 per year. “[It’s important because] we don’t seem to go to the doctor as regularly as we should, but we always seem to have health issues and die earlier.”

To find out where you or a loved one can enroll in person go to www.coveredca.com and click on find local help.

Next week: In African-American communities statewide, churches remain the de facto town square. How are black faith organizations stepping up to encourage enrollment in affordable healthcare?