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“What’s done… IS DONE!”

Lou Coleman

Lou Coleman

By Lou Coleman

For many of you, this might be one of the hardest truths to accept…..there is absolutely no hope of going and changing the past. “What’s done is done!” Your future is suffering because you can’t seem to forgive yourself for what you’ve already done. As sorry as we are for the things that we have done, we cannot go back in time and undo them. And what good is it anyway to sit and beat yourself up over the things that you’ve done? If you are really sorry, then pick yourself up and do something different with your life. Stop worrying about things that you cannot change, and do what you can to change the things that are still within your power to do something about, because “What’s done is Done!”

In Luke 9:62 we find a story that vividly illustrates the danger of looking back. God has just pronounced judgment on Sodom and Gomorrah and they are about to be destroyed. In the meantime, God sends a message to Lot and his family. “Flee for your life; do not look back, or stop anywhere in the valley; flee to the hills, lest you be consumed.” Lot and his wife, and their two daughters left behind their home as fire and brimstone rain down on Sodom and Gomorrah. Then the unexpected happened. Lot’s wife looked back with a degree of longing to return to what she had left, and she became a pillar of salt.  Her life was literally on the line, and rather than being fully engaged in surviving, she placed a higher priority on life’s lesser matters than on the greater one of preserving her life through God’s gift of protection. She looked back, revealing her heart still to be in Sodom, a type of the world. You cannot serve God and mammon. Her action indicated regret for having left. Jesus says, “No one who puts his hand to the plow and looks back is fit for the kingdom of God.” We must not let the past determine our future.

Today, let us resolve that the past will be the power from which we move forward, because the past is just that –“Past.” Paul is an example of a healthy view of the past. He owned his past as blasphemer, persecutor, and aggressor. He knew and accepted his past; he accepted responsibility and did not blame others for his actions. But, because Paul knew that he was forgiven, and because he confidently trusted God’s forgiveness, he did not retain the guilt of what he had done. He retained the memory, but it was his power, his strength, his motivation, his hope, and his ever present evidence and reminder of God’s grace.

It serves no purpose to deny, ignore, or hide the past. The past is to be accepted and owned.  But with that acceptance comes responsibility for the present, the ability to make choices, to grow, and to change.“….Forget those things which are behind, and reach forth unto those things which are before, and press toward the mark for the prize of the high calling of God in Christ Jesus!” {Phil 3:13-14}…. “Free at last, free at last, thank God Almighty, I’m free at last!”

 

 

 

NCAA reaches $20 million settlement with former players over college-themed video games

INDIANAPOLIS — The NCAA has announced a $20 million settlement with former players over college-themed basketball and football video games produced by Electronic Arts.

The NCAA said Monday that the agreement will provide money to plaintiffs headed by former Arizona State quarterback Sam Keller. The case was scheduled for trial in March 2015.

The settlement will award $20 million to certain Division I men’s basketball and Bowl Subdivision football players. Details were still be finalized.

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“If Not You… Then Who?”

Lou Coleman

Lou Coleman

By Lou Coleman

“I didn’t do it!”  “It’s not my fault!”… This is what you say when you blame other people for your problems. It’s a way of explaining why life hasn’t worked out the way you would like. You’ve been treated unfairly; you’ve ended up on the short end of the stick; you’ve been dealt a lousy hand of cards. You’re a victim. And that’s how you get through life—by blaming other people for the bad things that happen to you. If you lose your job, it’s because the boss was unreasonable; he didn’t understand you; he had it in for you; he hated you from the moment you walked into the office – “It’s not your fault!” Couldn’t be! Impossible! Unthinkable!

Sounds familiar?

These days it seem as if everyone has been exposed to the “Blame someone else Syndrome.” It’s your parents, brother, sister, pastor, deacons, preachers, church members, school teachers, classmates, boss, bus driver, friend, children, casino, and the co-workers fault that you have been contaminated with the “Blame someone else Syndrome.”

We are always “Passing the Buck.” In the beginning, Adam blamed Eve – and not only did he blame Eve, but he blamed God for giving her to him!  And he was not the only one playing the blame game. Eve blamed the serpent {Genesis 3: 1-14}. Neither accepted responsibility, both pointed the fault-finger away from them and somewhere else and entered into the victim-vortex where the swirl of “It’s not my fault,” kept them and will keep us locked out of truly living God’s unique call on our lives.

The truth is that whether it is physical, financial, or spiritual, whatever the issue, the response of some people will always be, “It’s not my fault!”  We live during a time when people are unwilling to take personal responsibility for their own lives, for their own welfare, for their own health, or for their own spiritual growth.  There is always a tendency to look for someone else to blame. But the fact is that when we stand before God and the judgment seat of Christ, we will answer for our own failures and the choices we have made.  “No Excuses will be Accepted!”

And what’s really sad, is that many in the church today have the “It’s not my fault,” mentality. They either make excuses or blame someone else for their own sins or shortcomings. It is time to take an honest look at ourselves by the standard of God’s Word, look at our sins for what they are, confess them, and ask God to forgive us. Then and only then, can we truly be fruitful in the Lord’s Kingdom.

So stop making excuses. Quit shifting the blame to others. Accept your circumstances and position, and instead of making excuses for your actions, change your behavior. We serve a great God.  Our limitations are God’s opportunities to show Himself mighty in our lives. Don’t play the blame game; own it by name and avoid the shame.