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Police Abuse Debate Is More Than A Black-White Issue

By Luis Vasquez-Ajmac, Urban News Service

While the national conversation on police and race seems like a black-and-white issue, many Latinos say they also feel mistreated by cops.

“I grew up in East L.A., in an economically depressed neighborhood,” said Long Beach Police Chief Robert Luna, the first Latino to lead the Los Angeles area’s second largest law-enforcement agency. “I did not have the most positive contact with the police or the people around me. I very much understand the concerns.”

Many Latinos report abusive experiences and negative opinions toward police, similar to those that numerous African-Americans have expressed nationwide, according to a survey by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. 

“Excessive police use was a huge issue for the Hispanic-American community,” said Jennifer Benz, AP-NORC’s deputy director. Beyond answering this study’s specific questions, some respondents volunteered that “they or someone in their family was harshly treated by the police at far higher levels than whites,” Benz said.

This is not just a white-and-black issue, according to Benz. “Across the country, roughly four in 10 Americans believe the reason for police violence is overall problems with race relations in our society,” she said. “Three-quarters of Americans think it would be more effective to have diverse police forces nationwide.”

AP-NORC polled 1,200 white, black and Latino Americans on these topics in July 2015.
Law enforcement “has a lot of work to do, to continue the dialogue and talk about the excessive use of force,” said LAPD Captain Tina Nieto, incoming president of the Hispanic American Police Command Officers Association.

The L.A. native echoes those who advocate closing racial disparities by recruiting and hiring more people of color. “It’s very important to make an attempt to have a police force that reflects the community that you are servicing,” Nieto said. “I believe when your police force reflects the community, there are better outcomes.” 
Bryan Stevenson, executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative, said that where officers reside affects these matters. “We need officers to live in the communities where they police,” he said. “When they live outside the cities that employ them and commute in from neighborhoods that have very different, less diverse demographics, problems are aggravated.”  

The Manhattan Institute’s Heather McDonald disagrees.

“This is an irrelevant consideration. It’s the classic Black Lives narrative that embraces the white cop/black victim line-up,” said the author of the new book, “The War on Cops.”

“The Justice Department came out with a report last year in Philadelphia. It found that black and Hispanic officers were far more likely than white officers to shoot an unarmed black suspect. I think the inquiry of an officer’s skin color is largely a side show,” she said.

Rene Galindo, a telecom network engineer for 2talk, grew up as a Mexican-American in South Central L.A. He said there are two systems of law: one for whites and another for people of color.

“You thought it was normal for cops to stop you for no reason, check your personal property under no suspicion at all,” Galindo said. “I’ve been held for no apparent reason, just for walking home from a friend’s place at night.”  Nieto, however, said police do not confront people willy-nilly. “I know we are not just stopping you because we want to stop you,” she said. “We are way too busy in the city of L.A. Citizens can always request a supervisor to the scene if you believe officers are doing something they are not supposed to do.” 

“Many people of color do not see cops as protectors, but we see the opposite,” said Dolores Huerta, co-founder of the United Farm Workers union, which represents thousands of Mexican-American agricultural laborers. “They harass, intimidate and brutalize people of color and kill.” 

White Americans have it different, some say.

“In most situations, white people are not presumed dangerous or guilty,” said the Equal Justice Initiative’s Stevenson. “Because most police officers are white, this means that white people face a different level of threat and risk when they encounter the police.” 

Despite racial gaps in perceptions of law enforcement, most Americans say they want more diverse police forces to ease ethnic tensions.

“It’s not surprising for those of us aware of how the Latino community across the country has been treated by police,” said Thomas A. Saenz, president of the Mexican-American Legal Defense and Educational Fund. “We need to recruit a more diverse police force.”

What it do with LUE: 2nd Annual Indie Artist Award Show

By Lue Dowdy

It’s here, “My, Music, My Mic -2015 Indie Artist’s Award Show” presented by LUE Productions. The show will be held on Saturday, October 15, 2016. It is a night of honor, recognition, and love for music! Come Out Celebrate With Us!

This year’s event activities consist of raffles, lLive performances, and a mini fashion show. In addition to the festivities, the following artists will be blessing the stage:  Annyett Royale, Bernard Holmes, D’yzil, Eugene Jones, Fitz Taylor, Gwaap Fam, Mack Pepperboy, Noface The Shadowmen, Nya Banxxx, Socal Street Team, Staxx Huges, and Tipse Smashgan. Red carepet performances include: Yung Muusik featuring Jamie Lopez, Shanita Williams –Poet, Bernice Celeste, Yungan, Sirr Jones, Mac Stardo, LA Duce, and Kei Lani Royalty.

If you want to become a sponsor for the event, we have affordable packages available. Vendor slots start at $100. There is limited space so get your spots in. You can pay via PayPal under Lue.Info@yahoo.com.

Tickets for the award show are $20 before October 1 and $25 after and at the door. The after part tickets are also $25. Tickets can be purchased via BrownPaperBag under Lue.Info@yahoo.com or by calling (909) 567-1000, (714) 833-3196, or (909) 556-7637. The show is from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m.

Young, Black Job Seekers Spruce Up Resumes, Aviation Careers Opening

By McKenzie Jackson, California Black Media

Recent college grads and job seekers under the age of 31 have a week to fly into a job applicant pool for a well-paying gig with the country’s national aviation authority.

The Federal Aviation Administration is accepting applications from entry-level candidates across the U.S. for air traffic controller positions until August 15.

And at least two Congressmen are looking to increase African-American outreach for the jobs. In the spring Reps. Carlos Curbelo of Florida and Sean Patrick Maloney of New York introduced House Resolution 5292, the Air Traffic Controller Hiring Improvement Act of 2016.

Among other things, the bipartisan legislation, which is currently making the rounds in the nation’s capital, aims at improving hiring and staffing of air traffic controllers at the FAA by directly notifying air traffic controller vacancies to Historically Black Colleges and other minority institutions.

Curbelo said in a May statement, “I am very pleased that this bill will also encourage the hiring of students graduating from minority-serving institutions.”

In a statement, the FAA said applicants for the position of Air Traffic Control Specialist-Trainee need to set-up an account on www.USAJobs.gov as soon as possible in order to apply for the highly competitive position.

“The agency expects more than 25,000 applications for approximately 1,400 positions during the seven-day job opening,” the statement read.

Good jobs are something black college grads across the nation are in short supply of. A 2014 study by the Center for Economic Policy Research revealed 12.4 percent of black college graduates between ages 22 – 27 are unemployed. For all college grads in the same age range the rate was 5.6 percent.

Over 20,000 FAA jobs will be open within the next three to five years across the country. Some of the positions including the air traffic controller role, pay upwards to $70,000 to $100,000 a year.

Air traffic controllers guide pilots, their planes and 2.2 million daily passengers from taxi to takeoff, through the air and back safely on the ground again. The FAA statement said air traffic controllers receive a wide range of training in controlling and separating live air traffic within designated airspace at and around an air traffic control tower, radar approach control facility, or air route traffic control center. 

“As a new ATCS, you will spend your first several months of employment in an intensive training program at the FAA Academy located in Oklahoma City,” the statement reads.

FAA Administrator Michael Huerta said in the newsletter the aviation authority “provides the safest, most efficient airspace system in the world and we need exceptional people to support our mission.”

Requirements for the job include being a U.S. citizen, being 31 or younger on Aug. 15, passing a medical examination, security investigation and the FAA air traffic pre-employment tests. Candidates must speak English clear enough to be understood over communications equipment and have three years of progressively responsible work experience or a Bachelor’s degree or a combination of post-secondary education and work experience that totals three years. Job inquirers must also be ready to move to an FAA facility based on agency staffing needs.

More Stability

In fact, air traffic controller is a career in the in-demand fields of accounting, business, computer science and engineering, which have lower unemployment rates. Glassdoor, a jobs and recruiting website, said plenty of top-notch jobs are appearing in the technology, finance and professional services industries.

Glassdoor and UC San Diego Extension recently conducted surveys that determined what the hottest jobs are based on career opportunities, base salary and open positions. The jobs listed included accountants, data scientist, human resource manager, marketing manager, nurse practitioner, software developers, market research analysts, and computer network architects.

Mary Walshok, associate vice chancellor of public programs and dean of UC San Diego Extension, said in a statement that the careers show both the value of a college degree and also the need for specialized training as technology is continuously reshaping the job market and the economy.

 “As Marc Andreessen recently opined, ‘Software is eating the world,'” Walshok said. “That fact is true in almost every top emerging career whether it be health care or marketing or financial analysis. It’s not enough to just know the fundamentals; you have to use technology to provide new insights.”