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Remembering California Pioneer, Celes King IV

Celes King IV

Celes King IV

On Saturday, March 15th, 2014, well known community leader, political and civil rights activist, Celes King IV, passed away by heart failure in San Diego.  He was surrounded by family and close friends.

Celes King IV was born in Los Angeles on October 19th, 1943, the first born of legendary Civil Rights leader and Bail Bondsman to the stars, General Celes King III, and Anita Lugo King, internationally respected, delegate to the UN World Conference on the Rights of Women.   As a youth he drove for his father and mother and in this capacity with his sister Teri he was able to participate in their parents hosting of prominent figures from around the world.  After attending Antioch College, Celes IV left the family business, set out on his own and managed several businesses throughout the country before returning to participate in the multi generational family business built around the Celes King Bail Bond companies.  After his return to the fold, the family suffered the loss of both parents and Celes IV then joined with his sister Teri who managed administration of the Bail Bond business internally with Celes IV handling the expediting of external affairs.

It was in this phase that Celes developed into a very effective lobbyist in the course of advocating for several organizations throughout the state including most notably the Congress of Racial Equality of California which had been founded by his father General Celes King, a veteran of the legendary Tuskegee Airmen.  Celes IV quickly became a popular and effective operative in the halls of government in both Los Angeles and Sacramento.  He was significantly able to work on both sides of the aisle, relentlessly advocating on behalf of the underserved communities.  Fellow directors of the CORE-CA Board and family recalled Celes frequently saying that his role in Sacramento was to “Comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable.”

With characteristic determination Celes founded the Family Foundation named after his parents Anita Lugo King and Celes King III.  He was also President and CEO of the King Central Self Development Foundation, The Phoenix Alliance and served on several Boards including the California Black Chamber of Commerce,  Advisory Board of Pacific Oaks College, and the Lillian Mobley Black Health and Education Task Force.

Celes was appointed by, CORE-CA and Kingdom Day Parade Chairman Adrian Dove, to proudly serve as CORE-CA Vice Chairman for Legislative Liaison, Education Policy and the Legal Defense Committees, where despite increasing health challenges he worked relentlessly and effectively on behalf of the community. throughout the state.

It was his close to the family collaborator Dove, who observed that, “Celes IV, the oldest son of a great man was driven to succeed far beyond any ordinary standards in order to righteously fill his father’s shoes by carrying forth the family legacy and taking it even to an extra step forward in every project he undertook.  We are thrilled to now to have witnessed Celes having succeeded”.  His ultimate focus has always been community and family.  His parents’ family motto, “Success is one step behind where you stop.”

Celes King IV, or “Uncle Mike” as children of the family and close friends sometimes refer to him, leaves behind his brother, Tobi, sister Teri, Significant Other Diane Merrifield, First Wife and lifetime friend Ilene, as well as his six children, and six grandchildren.

Services for Celes King, IV will be held March 29th. 11:00 a.m at Angeles Mesa Presbyterian Church, 3751 West 54th Street, Los Angeles 90043.

OTHER NOTABLE FACTS:

Preceded in transition by his; Father Celes King III, Mother Anita Lugo King, and Sister Toni King.

Succeeded by: Sister Teri King; Brother Toby King & Wife Terrie; Significant Other: Diane Merrifield, First Wife, lifetime friend and mother of his children; Children: Darcie, Derek, Dana, Danny, Leontyne; Three Nieces and Nephews: Tyia, Tyie, Tyona; Eight Grandchildren; Eight Grand Nieces and Nephews; and a host of friends.

A Hip Hop State of Mind

State of Mind Are Strippers, Drugs, and Money keeping Hip Hop alive? Or, does Hip Hop continue to survive due to its ability to inspire, motivate, and passionately serve as a voice for its fans worldwide? Has Hip Hop been over commercialized? Has its message been lost in all the money it generates? Are there smaller genres of Hip Hop that still embody the true nature of the musical movement? Is Hip Hop truly an expression of freedom of speech for a generation? From NWA and censorship to Common and Fox News, for a number of decades Hip Hop has taken on more than its fair share of criticism. Yet, after 40 years since its creation, a plethora of questions still remain.

In order to answer some of the most complex questions about Hip Hop, Dr. Niama T. Malachi orchestrated a dynamic study that would take her from the streets of Bronx, NY, where Hip Hop originated, to Hip Hop in its current most active form. She submerged herself in the Hip Hop culture by meeting with artists, video models, executives, pioneers, and members of the culture. She attended numerous video shoots, concerts, parties, cultural events, tours, and lectures; even once bravely taking on the role of a video model herself! During the study, Dr. Malachi ingeniously employed social psychological theory to evaluate the state of Hip Hop and its impact on the Black Community.

The OFFICIAL release date for “A Hip Hop State of Mind” is May 6th, 2014 and will be available on Amazon, Kindle and at Barnes & Nobles.  The launching of the book includes special invite release parties that will include panel discussions.

In the fall of 2014, Dr. Malachi begins her book tour and is presently accepting tour dates for locations to include New York, Atlanta and California with various Universities, bookstores and organizations. The tour will also include speaking engagements as well as opportunities for panel discussions at conferences and seminars. To schedule Dr. Malachi for book signings or speaking engagements, please contact KimiRhochelle of KRPR Media at krprmediadrmalachi@gmail.com.

Dr. Niama Malachi

Dr. Niama Malachi

About Dr. Niama T. Malachi

Dr. Niama T. Malachi hails from humble beginnings. With insurmountable determination and drive, she has forged through many obstacles. She recently attained a Doctorate in Applied Clinical Psychology from The Chicago School of Professional Psychology. In addition, she holds the position of Director of Performance Improvement, under the umbrella of a Fortune 500 company; she is also one of the youngest Directors in the organization. Dr. Malachi’s advocacy and activism is focused towards mental health services for underserved populations and the use of Hip Hop as a catalyst for social change. Her pioneering research initiatives involve Hip Hop and its impact on the black community, with over five years of concentrated experience on this topic. Dr. Malachi is a proud member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., where she served as the co-chair of the Pomona Valley Alumnae Chapter’s Social Action Committee. In this capacity, she also co-chaired the award winning State of Black Male/Female Relationships Conference. Dr. Niama T. Malachi is driven to provide mental health services for underserved populations. She continues to relentlessly construct ingenious methods in her approach.

Dr. Malachi will use social media as a communication forum for her readers and those that have questions.  Readers will be able post various scenarios and ask personal questions that will be answered.  In addition, Dr. Malachi will have various online discussions about “A Hip Hop State of Mind”. 

For more information on Dr. Niama T. Malachi, please visit www.drniamamalachi.com

African Americans and Prematurity: The Increased Risks Many Moms Face

Dr. Michael Forbes

Dr. Michael Forbes

By Michael Forbes, MD, FAAP, Director of Clinical Research and Outcomes Analysis, Akron Children’s Hospital, Akron, Ohio

There are an alarming number of preterm births in the U.S., with more than a half million babies born prematurely (before 37 weeks gestation) each year. For reasons unknown, African Americans experience the highest rate of prematurity at 17.1 percent, which is dramatically higher than the national average of 12 percent. In fact, the risk of preterm birth for African-American women is approximately 1.5 times the rate seen in Caucasian women.

Because they were not able to fully develop in their mother’s womb, preemies have unique health needs, often requiring specialized medical attention. Preemies often have underdeveloped lungs and immature immune systems, putting them at increased risk of developing a serious infection from a common respiratory virus known as respiratory syncytial virus (or RSV). RSV is the leading cause of infant hospitalizations for babies during the first year of life, and affects nearly all babies by age two.

Premature infants:

  • Are two times as likely to be admitted to the hospital for RSV-related symptoms compared with infants born at full term
  • May stay two times longer in the hospital than infants born at full term who are hospitalized for severe RSV disease

 Parents of all babies, particularly preemies, should be on the lookout for the signs and symptoms of severe RSV disease:

  • Coughing or wheezing that does not stop
  • Fast or troubled breathing
  • Spread-out nostrils and/or a caved-in chest when trying to breathe
  • Bluish color around the mouth or fingernails
  • Fever (especially if it is over 100.4°F in infants under 3 months of age)

Parents of babies who may be at high risk for severe RSV disease should talk to their doctor to learn all the ways to help protect their baby.

Visit www.rsvprotection.com for more information.