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What It Do With the LUE: Troy D. Taylor

Troy D. Taylor

Troy D. Taylor

It’s a beautiful day in the I.E., and I’m glad about it! It’s ya’ girl the crazy one, Miss LUE coming at you with ‘What it Do’! Sometimes it’s hard to select whom to feature in my column due to all the talent everywhere. This week’s selection was a no brainer. I would like to introduce a hardworking man that goes by the name of Troy D. Taylor.

Troy D. Taylor is a rational and impartial individual who enjoys intellectual pursuits and prizes independence is undoubtedly designed to be an entrepreneur. Troy D. Taylor, aka DjCahoots, is a California native that is a self-taught drummer. He has spent the last ten years producing music. After successfully going through and completing an accelerated academic program, Troy proudly served his country and emerged as a leader. His all-inclusive media arts and entertainment company, Rigorous Grind, is the invention of his analytic mind.

Rigorous Grind strategically responds to all of the industry needs through comprehensive service offerings. Troy Taylor’s life experiences has made him incredibly comfortable with hard work and high standards; he is a confident and knowledgeable pioneer in a demanding and competitive market. Please check him out on Facebook under Troy D. Taylor and the awesome services he provides.

Well that’s it that’s all! Until next week ONE LOVE!

BOTTOMLINE: Freedom can be a …

Publishers Commentary by Wallace J. Allen

Freedom does not negate physics. Newton’s law of motion says, “For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction…”

I am free to say what I want and you are free to respond! I am free to vaccinate and you are free to not vaccinate. I am free to hope that my vaccination shields me from measles etc… You are free to ’dodge’ or catch the measles, etc. You are free to ’dodge’ or catch the measles.

As to the child that is too young to vaccinate and is vulnerable and dependent on others being vaccinated, the parent/guardian must take charge. Since that parent/guardian cannot take charge of who is and who is not vaccinated, they must take charge of their child. If your child’s immune system is vulnerable should you trust the probability of others being vaccinated any more than you would trust a daycare service operated by the ”Redeemed Child Molester’s Association?”

Our society does not require people to make smart decisions. We are allowed the freedom to decide for ourselves with good or bad decisions. That same freedom requires us to deal with the repercussions, as well as the rewards of our decisions.

Freedom can be confusing and frustrating, and definitely requires responsibility. When confronted with the “Jim Crow” laws of the post civil war era, an era that obviously paid no heed to political correctness, a formerly enslaved man was overheard to say “Freedom can be a ‘B-word’!”

Full Circle: How I Discovered a Passion for Public Health

Quiana Lewis

Quiana Lewis

(Quiana Lewis joined the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in 2014 as a program associate, working to build a Culture of Health by helping all American residents attain stable, affordable health coverage.)

By Quiana Lewis

I am one of the more than 22,000 alumni whose careers have been shaped and lives changed by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Summer Medical and Dental Education Program (SMDEP).

For me, medicine was a logical decision: my academic performance in science was good, I liked interacting with people, and I didn’t want to be a lawyer.

Clearly, my perceptions of medicine and careers in health were limited.

Then came my SMDEP summer at UCLA, one of the most transformative experiences of my college education. A pipeline program for students who typically are underrepresented in health care fields, SMDEP exposed me to the study and practice of medicine and dentistry that enriched my understanding for both fields. I shadowed physicians, received enrichment in core science subjects, and learned how to excel in medical and dental school. I also received hands-on laboratory experience to create dental models and conducted health screenings at community fairs.

The unexpected lessons from the program, however, were the ones that stuck with me most.

The core science classes were structured using case-based learning methods. This was a departure from the didactic way I was used to learning science. The curriculum used patient case studies to teach biology, anatomy, and physiology. The lessons were investigative in nature and discussion-based. We discussed not only patients’ medical issues, but also the socioeconomic factors affecting them. This piqued my interest. Until then, I had not thought deeply about the impact of systems on the health of individuals. Throughout that summer, I read books and journal articles about the social determinants of health, medical anthropology, and epidemiology. The more I read, the more questions I posed, and the more I realized this was the career path for me.

After SMDEP, I continued to explore the vast world of public health at school and in subsequent summer programs. I graduated from Fisk University, and went on to obtain a master’s degree in public health from Yale University. Since graduate school, I have worked in state and local health departments, community organizations, and health consulting firms.

My public health journey has come full circle. I discovered my passion for population health with the help of RWJF, by way of SMDEP. Now, as an RWJF employee, I work with the Foundation to build a Culture of Health across the nation.

Without SMDEP, I might never have discovered my passion.


SMDEP is currently recruiting for its 2015 summer program through March 1, at 12 sites across the country, including Case Western Reserve University, Columbia University, Duke University, Howard University, Rutgers University, University of Texas, UCLA, University of Louisville, University of Nebraska, University of Virginia, University of Washington, and Yale University.

For more information, visit http://smdep.org/apply-to-smdep/