Home / Local / SAN BERNARDINO CITY UNIFIED STARTS SCHOOL YEAR WITH ONE MORE NEW SCHOOL AND RENAMES ANOTHER CAMPUS IN HONOR OF FORMER MAYOR

SAN BERNARDINO CITY UNIFIED STARTS SCHOOL YEAR WITH ONE MORE NEW SCHOOL AND RENAMES ANOTHER CAMPUS IN HONOR OF FORMER MAYOR

H. Frank Dominguez Elementary School

H. Frank Dominguez Elementary School

San Bernardino City Unified School District (SBCUSD) will welcome students back for classes on Monday, August 4, the same day it opens the new H. Frank Dominguez Elementary School and the renamed W. R. “Bob” Holcomb Elementary School.

Dominguez Elementary School, located at 135 S. Allen Street, will serve 408 students in grades kindergarten through six. It is named for Vanir Group of Companies founder H. Frank Dominguez, who passed away in 2004 and left a legacy of community and philanthropic service.

Dominguez Elementary will be an exploratory school, where students will begin learning about potential careers while developing 21st-Century skills, like creativity, communication, collaboration, critical thinking, and civility, said Principal Alejandro Hernandez.

“We’re not going to put limits on our students,” said Hernandez, who previously served as principal of Muscoy Elementary School. “Our job is to help them explore the world and find their passion, whether it be engineering or culinary arts.”

Dominguez Elementary will hold a weeklong open house for parents and students starting on July 28 from 9 to 11 a.m., Monday through Friday.

The former Little Mountain Elementary campus, located at 1345 West 48th Street in San Bernardino’s north end, has been renamed W. R. “Bob” Holcomb Elementary School in memory of the man who went on to become the city’s longest-serving mayor.  Holcomb, who championed civil rights and helped bring Cal State San Bernardino to the city, died in 2010.

Superintendent Dr. Dale Marsden believes both schools will be a renewed source of pride and hope for San Bernardino.

“The namesakes of these two schools were great community leaders who dedicated their lives to instilling hope in our city,” Marsden said.  “Their legacy will remain alive as students learn about them and are inspired to aim for a bright future of their own.”

 

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