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Pan African Film Festival Closes Out with Man in 3B, Celebrity After Party

By Naomi K. Bonman

It’s always an exciting affair to have the pleasure of covering one of the largest and long standing film festivals within the Black community. On Sunday, February 15, the Pan African Film Festival (PAFF) closed out an amazing two weeks of panels, international films, and workshops with the highly anticipated film, The Man in 3B, based off of the book by world renowned Black author, Carl Webber. The premiere of the film took place at Rave Cinemas 15 located at the Baldwin Hills Crenshaw Plaza in Los Angeles. It was preceded with a red carpet and followed by an exclusive after party.

The film is directed by Trey Haley; produced by Princess Monique, ND Brown, Veronica Nichols, Tracey Moore, Jeffery Dumpson, and Walter Nixon; and the film features an array of incredibly talented actors which include Lamman Rucker, Christian Keyes, DB Woodside, Brely Evans, Kellita Smith, Nefessa Williams, Billie Dee Williams, Jackee Harry, Marla Gibbs, Robert Ri’chard, Anthony Montgomery, and Olivia Longott.

Man in 3B is a romantic thriller following the story of Daryl Graham (Lamman Rucker) who just moved into a Jamaica, Queens apartment building, and his neighbors, female and male alike, can’t stop talking about him. From his extreme attractiveness to his undeniable swag, Daryl is the man every woman wants to be with and every man wants to be.

After the screening there was a Q&A session with the cast and crew. During the session each actor gave a few pointers, tips, and advice to those who want to break into the industry. Some of them were to “continue working hard, network at film festivals such as PAFF, and to be a pleasant spirit because no one wants to work with an individual who becomes a headache.” They also mentioned how each of them started with several littles roles which then opened the door for their big break. So as long as you keep working hard and NETWORK, NETWORK, and NETWORK with the right individuals, your goals and dreams will unlock.

The production crew has been blessed to receive several offers regarding distribution and screening of the film for the future. Be sure to keep an eye out for the film to hit your local theater and/or department store. Please visit www.tridestined.com for updates regarding the film.

Photos by John A. Castro & Naomi K. Bonman

Riverside Celebrates 36th Annual Black History Culture Parade, Expo

Article and Photos By John Coleman

RIVERSIDE, CA- In 1965/66, Riverside was the first largest school district in the US to voluntarily integrate their schools and to go forward despite, weeks later, the arson burning of its Lowell Elementary School. The 2015 Riverside Black History Parade and Expo will, in part, celebrate the 50th anniversary of that decision and the part it continues to play in Riverside’s becoming a ‘world class city’.

Dignitaries who participated in the 2015 Black History and Culture Parade included:   Rusty Bailey, Mayor;    Sergio Diaz, Police Chief;    Michael Moore, Fire Chief;   David Hansen, Supt, RUSD;     Stan Sniff, Sheriff;     Richard Roth, State Senator;     Jose Medina, Member, State Legislative Assembly.

Other Parade participants included:  community leaders, educators, business owners, ministers and members of their churches,   college and youth groups,   community service and activity programs,   NAACP,   Tuskegee Airmen,   Prince Hall Masons and Shriners,   car clubs and their prize auto collections, and many other people who march with their organizations to have fun.

There has to be recognition for those crowd pleasers that have their own ‘groupies’ who follow them whenever they parade, these include   The Ex-Plosive Drill and Drum Squad;

The Black Diamond Step Team; Black Diamond Cheer and Dance Team; and of course the San Bernardino Westside Steppers Drill and Drum Team.

Craig Goodwin, Wanda Scruggs, & Jeanie Gaines were announcers at the viewing stand, across from the historical County Court House.

 

BOTTOMLINE… Institutional Racism Requires Black History Month

Publishers Commentary by Wallace J. Allen

Crispus Attucks

Crispus Attucks

Black History Month is an acknowledgment of the fact that “Black Lives Matter”! The history of the planet and its people is peppered with accomplishments of adventure, creativity and tenacity by men and women of color.  The need to provide special attention to the importance of Black people in the development of the planet and Western Civilization is based on the institutional justification of Black enslavement. The Western Civilization economic needs justified a policy of Colonization that time has lived to determine as racist and exploitive. America’s greatness is tainted by our history of slavery and denial of reparations for the enslaved and their children’s, children’s, children.  The first official blood spilled for America’s freedom was that of Crispus Attucks, a Black man. Despite the hate constantly heaped upon Blacks in America, supported by the laws and policy of America’s institutions, Black people have served, contributed and earned the right to be respected and honored as a golden thread in America’s fabric.

Black History Month is a time that the institutions of America need to step up and acknowledge the equality gap. The elected officials, especially those who are in place because of Black elective support, as the representatives of the institutions that still get it wrong, should use BHM as a time to address the Black Community and express concern for the inequality that still exists. They need to attend events and place advertisements in the programs that are advocating for equal access and opportunity for the least served.  Though we applaud the accomplishments of Alexander Dumas, we cannot forget that Blacks are statistical victims in America’s education system.  Our elected officials are in charge of the schools that fail our children and the society that could benefit from another great Black scholar. They are in charge of our cities and counties where public safety and other government jobs are issued to the family members and friends of the “all ready employed good ole boys”.   There are still many individuals who have racist tendencies, but it is the institutions that have the power of policy that causes havoc to race relations in America.

Black History Month is the time that allows for image correction. The Black image is in need of an upgrade from both, the inside and outside… Black folk cannot afford to have “a season of pride”.  We should regard pride as a lifestyle not an occasion.  A lifestyle of pride requires us to realize that what we do today will be what our children’s children will regard as their history.  We will want them to know that we held our elected officials to a standard of service and respect that earned our votes.  The need for remembering Black people’s historical contributions will continue as long as our elected officials continue to allow and promote policies such as “war on drugs” and “three strikes”. Those policies are racist and they develop the statistics that make Blacks appear to be a social problem as opposed to the benevolent contributors that history proves.

Register to vote and vote! Take your children to a City Council, a School Board or County Board of Supervisors meeting, and explain how the officials get there and how they are replaced by election or recall.  Who you and I voted for and where you and I spent our money will become important personal history that has social implications for our children.  Let us get it right!