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San Bernardino Has a New King and Queen for 2015!

San Bernardino King and Queen

SAN BERNARDINO, CA- The San Bernardino Black Culture Foundation is happy to announce the 2015 Senior King and Queen.  They are Joyce Payne and Mansie Booker and they will be crowned Friday, February 6, 2015.  This is an invitation only event, so if you would like to attend, please contact Margaret Hill at (909) 864-3267.

JOYCE PAYNE – SENIOR QUEEN

Joyce Payne was born in Los Angeles, CA, and attended school there.  She received her Bachelor of Arts in History and her Administrative Credential from California State University, San Bernardino, Pre-Doctorial Studies at Mercer University, Macon, GA and Master of Educational Administration from Boston State College.

Joyce has been a teacher, vice principal and principal for the San Bernardino City Unified School District and recently retired.  She was a long time principal at Dr. Howard Inghram Elementary School but completed her career at Davidson Elementary School.  She also taught in Peach County, Georgia, and Middlesex Community College, Burlington, Massachusetts.  She also served on the school board in Lincoln, Massachusetts.

Joyce is very active in the community.  She is a member of Temple Missionary Baptist Church where she is the director of Christian education.  Other activities includeCharter member of National Sorority of Phi Delta Kappa, Inc., Delta Rho Chapter, Our Children Sing, Board of Directors, Former Member, California State University Alumni Board, Lifetime Alumni Member, California State University, San Bernardino. She also participates in Community Outreach Programs addressed parenting, literacy, career development and goal setting.

MANSIE BOOKER – SENIOR KING

Mansie Booker, Jr. was born in Burlington, North Carolina on March 18, 1944 to Rev. Mansie Booker, Sr. and Gladys Marie Booker. He is the youngest of two children. At the age of four his family relocated to Raleigh, North Carolina where he received his elementary education at St. Monica’s Catholic School. He graduated from J.W. Ligon High School in 1962 and entered the United States Air Force.

In addition to the above, Mansie has been an active member of the Highland Family YMCA and Temple Missionary Baptist Church where he continues to use his production skills. Annually Mansie provides the Black Culture Foundation a video profile of the Humanitarian of the Year awardees. He also videotapes the annual Black Rose event.

Mansie is widowed and is the father of two children, seven grandchildren and four great grandchildren. He attended Yuba College, The University of Maryland, University of Oklahoma and The University of Minnesota and is a graduate of the Community College of the Air Force.

 

 

 

 

BOTTOMLINE: “Change is Occurring…and Hope is Alive!”

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Publishers commentary by Wallace J. Allen

Dr. King’s Birthday requires us to annually measure the amount of successful change that has occurred since his death. Our friend Celes King IV was quick to say, “Perception is reality.” I think we can agree that the election of Barrack Obama to President of the United States boosted the image of Black men across the planet. It must be considered that if “Black lives matter” is a truer statement today than when Dr. King was alive, that Barrack Obama being President adds to that truth!   In several years, by 2016, people aged ten years and younger will represent members of an exclusive group. The only President of the United States that they will have experienced is a Black Man.  They, having witnessed such proof, will grow up expecting that Blacks can and will excel. That is a major long term benefit of Mr. Obama being President.  He is an inspiration. He inspires young Black children to want to be like him, to become important and influential members of society. He also shows the non-Blacks who harbor the false impression that “Blacks can’t” to understand that “Blacks can” and that society benefits when “Blacks do!  We know that low expectations generally come true.  Increased expectations allow room for increased participation and performance.

Increased expectations will cause among other things, a greater competition for participation and an expectation that winning is for the well prepared. Just because the world is more willing to accept that a Black man can do, does not mean that it will be easier for him to do; however, easy is not a requirement!

As we measure successful change, access to opportunity for those who have been deliberately denied that access, is an issue. The imagery of success is great for perception, but reality requires a job count and a measurement of education and quality of life. Access to education, jobs and quality of life for most Americans, Blacks in particular, has diminished since Dr. King’s death. The image of the most prestigious office holder on the planet, being racially disrespected under the guise of politics has been a reminder to “old school” witnesses, that racism is alive and that to some Republicans, greed and or “white privilege” is more important than the welfare of the Country.

So, in closing, I will say that the fresh sheets and pillow cases of opportunity make the American bed look better, but the mattress is still lumpy with racism, making a peaceful night hard to come by. Change is occurring but the need for hope is very alive!

 

 

 

 

 

The NAACP Images Awards Prepares for the Big Day with Luncheon

 

Imani Hakim

Imani Hakim

PHOTOS AND WRITE UP BY NAOMI K. BONMAN

 BEVERLY HILLS, CA- The stars of Hollywood, along with authors, poets, screen writers, and directors came dressed to impressed as they stepped on the red carpet prior to the 34th annual NAACP Image Awards luncheon. The private luncheon was held at the Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills, California on Saturday, January 17. The 34th Annual NAACP Image Awards will be held on Friday, February 6 at the Pasadena Civic Auditorium located at 300 E. Green Street in Pasadena. The show starts at 8 p.m. and is a black tie affair. To purchase tickets, please visit www.naacpimageawards.net. To view more photos, visit sophisticatedrelations.com/naacp-luncheon.