Home / Tag Archives: slider (page 10)

Tag Archives: slider

School Superintendent Shares Dinner with Dads

dinner with dad

Dinner with Dads

VICTORVILLE, CA- What happens at the dinner table stays in the hearts and minds of children. At least that is the message a group of fatherhood, community and education advocates throughout the Victorville valley are working hard to get out.

“Dinner With Dad” is a community outreach event hosted by hip hop recording artist, television personality (Men of Faith In Action) and Victorville resident, “Justified,” focused on bringing fellowship and resources to fathers wanting to make a positive difference in the lives of their children.

Dr. Ronald Williams, Victor Valley Union High School District, was a featured guest at the February 4 “Dinner with Dad” event. He shared the importance of both fatherhood and parent engagement in a child’s education.  As well as, how fathers can impact and create key networks for children and communities they live in.

Street Positive CEO, Terry Boykins, is an organizer and sponsor of Dinner with Dads.  He commented, “Years ago myself and other fatherhood advocates, namely Marcelino “Mars” Serna, discussed the importance of connecting fathers and student academic achievement, as well as, positive community modeling throughout San Bernardino County and the Inland Empire in general. Seeing these young fathers taking a proactive position to make a positive difference is very exciting.”

In addition to education and community, Dinner with Dad also featured speakers and resources on mental health, financial planning, travel, communications, safety, fitness, employment and other topics of interest to help fathers succeed in parenting.

For more information on Dinner with Dad call (442) 284.3733, or visit www.streetpositive.com.

Assemblymember Brown’s Committee Hearing Focused on Increasing Diversity in Business

20160122_AD 47 (Brown) Women and Girls of Color

SAN BERNARDINO, CA- Increasing diversity in corporate America, entrepreneurship and academia were the major issues discussed at the Select Committee on the Status of Girls and Women of Color hearing that was chaired by Assemblymember Cheryl R. Brown (D-San Bernardino) in Fontana.

“We convened this hearing to examine issues that impact women of color in California who own businesses and work in corporate America.  Our major objective is to learn what the state can do to create a pipeline for girls and women of color to pursue business careers,” stated Assemblymember Brown. “Ultimately, our goal is to improve business opportunities for women of color.”

The hearing included testimonies by women of color who own and operate small to mid-sized businesses throughout the Inland Empire. Additionally, panelists from major corporations provided guidance on climbing the corporate ladder. Program participants included: Kimberly Freeman, Assistant Dean for Diversity Initiatives and Community Relations, UCLA; Dr. Adina Sterling, Assistant Professor of Organizational Behavior, Stanford Graduate School of Business; Dr. Sacha Joseph-Mathews, Associate Professor, University of the Pacific; Dr. Michele Turner, Executive Director of the Black Alumni Association, USC; Hilda Kennedy, President, AmPac Tri State CDC; Maria Molina Solano, Executive Director, National Latina Business Women Association-IE; Kiana Webb-Severloh, President/CEO, Webb Family Enterprises; Quita Highsmith, Franchise Head/Sr. Director for Tamiflu, Genentech; Jennifer Fisher, Intellectual Property Counsel, Boeing; Evelin Martinez, Area President (Inland Empire), Wells Fargo & Co.; Annabel Chang, Director of Public Policy, Lyft; Mahlet Getachew, Senior Legal Counsel, GoPro, Inc.;  Luz Rodriguez-Roldan, Assistant Manager of Human Resources, California Steel Industries; Lupita Sanchez-Cornejo, Director of External Affairs, AT&T; and Kim Winston, Senior Manager of Government Relations, Starbucks.

All panelists agreed that we need to inform women of color that business is a viable career path. Additionally, we need to make intentional efforts to encourage them to pursue business careers because they ultimately create more jobs for both men and women. Kiana Webb of Webb Family Enterprises spoke about her experience as the owner and operator of 16 McDonald’s restaurants and employer of approximately 1,300 individuals.

“As a business owner, one of the best things about what I do is that I get to create my own experience,” said Webb. “It’s not necessarily just the challenges that we’re facing, it’s also the opportunities that we are creating, and the path that you can make for yourself.”

Ms. Webb suggested that we need to continue to have conversations about what we can do to help women of color succeed in business professions. Likewise, panelist Quita Highsmith of Genentech, a biotechnology company, suggested that women of color need an advocate to open doors for them.

“For women of color, you need a sponsor that can open the door for you when the door is closed as they are having discussions about talent. You need someone in a position of power who can be your advocate; someone who’s willing to put their neck on the line for you. You need a champion, and a personal board of directors to provide you with professional guidance and emotional security,” she said.

Evelin Martinez of Wells Fargo Bank called upon corporations to rise to the challenge of supporting students and their educational needs. She stated, “I would not be where I am today if I did not have mentors along the way. I think the hardest thing to do is to ask for help. We can’t wait for people to ask for help, we need to reach out to them. We need to have a call to action for corporations to provide access to mentorship and information so we can fix the issues that we have.”

The academia panel echoed some of the same concerns, and added that not enough women are pursuing business degrees.

“Women of color are more likely to pursue degrees in social sciences than in business,” said Dr. Adina Sterling, Stanford University. “The UC system indicated that 209 women of color graduated with an undergraduate degree in business last year compared to almost 3,000 that graduated with social sciences degrees. One way to encourage girls and women of color to pursue degrees in business is to increase the number of professors and teacher assistants who look like them.”

Many studies suggest that faculty makeup has a direct impact on academic success among students of color. According to Dr. Sacha Joseph-Matthews of the University of Pacific, women of color represent only eight percent of faculty nationwide.

“We really need more faculty of color in positions on campuses,” said Dr. Joseph-Matthews. “Often, on campuses, women of color do not feel they’re included. They feel this is not a place where they can get a sense of community and that becomes a huge problem. If we do not have women of color in key administrative roles, where they can influence campus-wide decision making on recruitment, admissions, retention and student life; and furthermore, how can we make campuses inclusive spaces for women of color?”

The committee concluded that additional mentorship programs are needed to encourage women of color to pursue business. To view the hearing in its entirety, please visit: http://asmdc.org/members/a47/.  For more information, contact Ashley Jones at (909) 381-3238.

 

 

Residents Should Benefit from City’s Receivership Program

A study and recommendation by Keith McCarter, B.S., J.D., McCarter University

Pursuant to Health and Safety Code Section 17980-17992, the city, county, state, health department or other relevant governmental agencies may bring an action in the courts to appoint someone to manage and repair a distresses property.

In our case, the government entity is the City of San Bernardino.  Currently the court has appointed one person as the receiver.  This article will examine more plausible solutions to the receivership program and to suggest to the San Bernardino City Attorney’s Office more viable solutions which will include the benefiting of San Bernardino citizens opposed to benefiting only one particular party.

To the City’s Attorney’s Office credit, they have informed me that they will soon be preparing an RFQ to find more viable receivers for the program.  Thus prior to the RFQ I have some specific suggestions on how we can have this program benefit our residents more.

I will start with a brief summary of the law:

The Law

17980a. THE CITY MAY CLAIM GIVE NOTICE TO DISTRESSED PROPERTIES OF 30 DAYS OR LESS.  AFTER EXPIRATION OF NOTICE THE CITY CAN A COMPLAINT IN THE COURT AGAINST THE PROPERTY AND ITS OWNER.

NEW PURCHASER OR POSSESSOR OF A DISTRESSED PROPERTY MUST BE GIVEN AT LEAST 60 DAYS TO CORRECT THE DISTRESSED ELEMENTS OF THE PROPERTY.

17980b  PREVIOUS LIEN HOLDERS MAY RELEASE THEIR LIEN AND NOTIFY THE CITY WITHIN 30 DAYS OF RELEASING THE LIEN.

17980c  IF THE BUILDING IS IN REALLY BAD SHAPE, among other things, THE CITY CAN ORDER THE DEMOLITION OF THE STRUCTURE.

17980.1  CITY MUST TELL THE COURT SPECIFIC ELEMENTS OF SAFETY VIOLATIONS IN ORDER FOR THE COURT TO ACT.

RECEIVER MAY BE APPOINTED AND THEY HAVE A WIDE RANGE OF RIGHTS WHICH INCLUDES PLACING LIENS ON THE PROPERTY, GETTING LOANS TO REPAIR THE PROPERTY, MAKING REPAIRS AND MUCH MORE

17980.2  RECEIVER MAY RECORD LIEN

17980.3. THE RIGHTS OF A RECEIVER DURING AN ABATEMENT PROCEEDING IS NEAR EQUAL TO THAT OF A BANK DURING A FORECLOSURE PROCEEDING

17980.4  THE CITY MAY SUE ALL DEFENDANTS TO COLLECT FEES AND EXPENSES

17980.5  CITY MAY KEEP AN ACCOUNT SPECIFICALLY FOR THE PURPOSES OF REQUESTING AND COLLECTING JUDGMENTS AGAINST DISTRESSED PROPERTIES.

17980.6.  CITY MUST POST A SIGN ON DISTRESSED PROPERTY SAYING IT HAS BEEN IDENTIFIED AS A DISTRESSED PROPERTY

17980.7.  AN OWNER OF DISTRESSED PROPERTY MUST COMPLY WITH THE CITY’S DEMAND TO REPAIR SAID PROPERTY.  IF NOT, THE CITY MAY SEEK A JUDGEMENT AND IMPOSE ADDITIONAL PENALTIES.  IF THE OWNER STILL DOES NOT COMPLY, THE CITY MAY REQUEST THE COURT TO APPOINT A RECEIVER.  A RECEIVER IS A PERSON who TAKE POSSESSION OF THE PROPERTY, MAKE THE NECESSARY REPAIRS AND SELL THE  PROPERTY TO PAY THE COST OF THE RECEIVER AND THE LIENS ON THE PROPERTY.  IN ORDER TO BE CONSIDERED FOR APPOINTMENT AS A RECEIVER, A PERSON OR ORGANIZATION MUST. “demonstrated to the court his or her capacity and expertise to develop and supervise a viable financial and construction plan for the satisfactory rehabilitation of the building.”

IN ITS DISCRETION THE COURT MAY APPOINT A NON-PROFIT OR COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION AS A RECEIVER

THE RECEIVER MUST SUBMIT MONTHLY REPORTS TO THE COURT.  THE RECEIVER’S JOB IS FINISHED ..” when the conditions cited in the notice of violation have been remedied in accordance with the court order or judgment and a complete accounting of all costs and repairs has been delivered to the court.”

THE COURT MAY CONTINUE TO RETAIN CONTROL OF THE PROPERTY FOR AN ADDITIONAL 18 MONTHS.  THE ORIGINAL OWNER CAN BE GIVEN THE OPPORTUNITY TO REGAIN THE POSSESSION OF HIS PROPERTY IF HE PAID ALL COSTS ASSOCIATED WITH THE REPAIR OF THE PROPERTY AND THE FEES ASSOCIATED WITH THE PROPERTY

17980.8.  COURT MAY REFER MATTER TO ADMINISTRATIVE HEARINGS.

Rationale to Benefit the Community

With this summary OF THE LAW, we must keep in mind the goal of any program in which the city intends to initiate.  The goal is for the programs to benefit the residents of the City of San Bernardino as much as feasibly possible.

Here are things we must attempt to obtain with this particular program.  Firstly, any opportunity to buy, remodel and sell distressed homes should first be offered to the citizens of the ward where the property is located.  Secondly, if there are no takers, the opportunity should be offered to the residents of the city.  Third, the opportunity should be offered to people who are located in the county of San Bernardino.  Last but not least, if no one from the first three categories wish to purchase the blighted home, the opportunity may be offered to others outside the county.  In no instance should this benefit be offered directly to companies or people outside of our county first.

Let us go a little deeper into this conversation.  Taking into consideration the importance of the role of receiver, local people, non-profits and businesses must first be given the opportunity of becoming a receiver of a particular property because with this position lies the power to reap financial benefits.

Suggestions for giving ownership to the Community

First and foremost the City Attorney’s office must halt all appointments of receivers until a viable list of receivers which represents the community can be created.  These receivers must then be categorized by wards.  This is a must.

Only after this has been completed should the City Attorney’s Office  be allowed to use their discretion to recommend an appointment of a receiver to the court.  I suggest the use of the rationale stated above where the opportunity is first offered to a receiver which lives in or near the ward of the property in question

Option 1 to consider.  “It takes two to tango.”  Pursuant to Health and Safety Code 17980, after giving due notice the City can elect to file an action to initiate court proceedings.  However the city may use its discretion to facilitate an offer for a person or company to buy the property from the owner and promise to make repairs within a certain period of time after the purchase prior to filing a claim against the delinquent property owner.  Furthermore, pursuant to 17980b, the city can agree to release the fees and penalties on the property if the new purchaser makes the necessary repairs within a certain period of time.

This option will save the time and money of having to go to court.  Also, from the list of entities the City chooses from the future RFQ, they can chose a person or entity in the ward to solicit a purchase bid for the property.  These actions are wholly within the City Attorney’s discretion

Option 2. 

Pursuant to 17980.1.(a)  The city may request an “order to show cause” which is basically the first step in asking the court to appoint a receiver for the distressed property.

My suggestion is simple, at this point, while the city is submitting the required elements of 17980.1.(a)1  to  17980.1.(a)3, they can also submit a recommendation as to which receiver they wish to be appointed.  It is true that the final decision over who is appointed as the receiver is that of the court.  However, the court relies heavily on the recommendation of the city because the city is the party who initiates the action.

If in fact the city make a recommendation, then that recommendation should be that of a person or entity which lives in the ward, city or county respectively as stated above.

Option 3.  Simply stated, create a first time home buyer program centered around the revitalization of the distressed properties

These are very simple suggestions which will benefit the San Bernardino residents greatly.  I personally wish to see community groups, however non church affiliated, to become receivers of these properties   Bringing the element of religion into this already complicated equation will be detrimental to the efficiency and proper use of the public policies expressed in this article.  For this reason I do not recommend allowing church organizations to be appointed as receivers.  Last thing we need is someone injecting a 1st amendment claim into a receivership matter.  This will undoubtedly cost much more time and money for a process which does not need to be so complicated.

One possible barrier to being listed as a possible receiver is the setting of an arbitrary level of needed capital.  According to 17980.3.(a) the receiver has the authority to get a loan to cover the cost of the repairs.  Thus, as long as a person has the ability to obtain a loan, they should be given due consideration for being appointed as a receiver

For Members of the Community

I suggest all organizations, not for profit organizations or even individual people who are interested in becoming a receiver to do two things. 1. Apply to the San Bernardino Superior court to be appointed as a receiver when and if needed.  2.  Complete the RFQ which the city will create in the near future concerning the blight of distressed properties.