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The 126th Tournament of Roses –Was Truly “Inspiring”

Love Boat cast in front of Princess Cruises Float  (L to R)  Fred Grandy (Chief Purser Gopher),Lauren Tewes (Cruise Director Julie),Gavin MacLeod (Captain Stubing),Ted Lange (Bartender Isaac) Jill Whelan (Captain's daughter Vicki), Bernie Kopell (Doc),

Love Boat cast in front of Princess Cruises Float (L to R)
Fred Grandy (Chief Purser Gopher),Lauren Tewes (Cruise Director Julie),Gavin MacLeod (Captain Stubing),Ted Lange (Bartender Isaac)
Jill Whelan (Captain’s daughter Vicki), Bernie Kopell (Doc),

By Earl Heath
Rose Bowl Queen Madison Triplett with U of  Oregon President Scott Coltrane and wife

Rose Bowl Queen Madison Triplett with U of Oregon President Scott Coltrane and wife

Its been an annual event for well over a century and the 2015 Tournament of Roses didn’t disappoint. The theme “Inspiring Stories was named in honor of  one of America’s war hero’s of WWII Louis Zamperini. Seven years ago Rose Bowl 2015 President Richard Chenin read the book “Unbroken” by Laura Hillenbrand. The story of USC Graduate and Olympian in the 1936 games became an air bombardier.

Zamperini spent two years as a POW in Japan after his plane went down in the Pacific Ocean. He and a crew-mate survived for 47 days in shark infested waters before being captured by the Japanese. After a family discussion, the theme “Inspiring Stories” was born.
“We thought the story was so inspirational,” said Cheinn.  “It was a family idea”.

Luke Zampeerini speaks at Kick-off Luncheon

Luke Zampeerini speaks at Kick-off Luncheon

Zamperini passed away last July two months after being named Grand Marshal. He was represented by his family during the parade. “The Love Boat” cast reunited to celebrate Princess Cruises 50th anniversary by appearing on a float at the Rose Bowl Parade. The Love Boat cast, including Gavin MacLeod (Captain Stubing), Fred Grandy (Chief Purser Gopher), Ted Lange (Bartender Isaac), Bernie Kopell (Doc), Lauren Tewes (Cruise Director Julie) and Jill Whelan (Captain’s daughter Vicki), recently named Regal Princess, having served as the ship’s godparents before the cruise ship’s maiden Caribbean season and their appearance in the New Year’s Day parade. Ted Lange is still as sharp as ever. The show ran for ten years and has a place in everyone’s heart. “It was about romance every week ,“ said Lange. That’s the one thing that’s in a lot of people lives tuned in because the show gave them a feeling .”
“Since the theme of this year’s Rose Parade was ‘Inspiring Stories,’ we thought it was the perfect opportunity to launch our 50th anniversary year celebrations,” said Jan Swartz, president of Princess Cruises. “For the last five decades our guests have been sailing with us to amazing places and they’ve returned with inspiring memories that have lasted a lifetime, and we want to celebrate this throughout our golden anniversary year.”
The Princess Cruises float measured 60 feet long and 24 feet high with more than 24,000 flowers and natural materials. Flowers included roses, orchids and carnations, dendrobs, tulips, cymbidiums, delphiniums and gerbera daisies.
The Donate to Life Parade float represents thousands around the world. In their passing deceased donors open up a whole new world of health, sight  and mobility to people in need.  John Brockington won the National Championship in the 1968 Rose Bowl while playing for Ohio State. He went on to play for the Green Bay Packers.  He moved to San Diego and befriended long time Packer fan Diane Scott. He suffered kidney failure in 2000. In 2001 she donated her kidney to John they later married. In the Parade John rode the Float  and Dianne was one of  30 donors to walk along side the Donate to Life float .
The Pasadena Tournament of Roses is a volunteer organization that annually hosts the Rose Parade, the Rose Bowl Game and a variety of associated events. The Tournament’s 935 volunteer members act as ambassadors of the organization within the community and serve on one of 31 committees that ensure the success of the parade and game. Collectively, they contribute upwards of 80,000 hours of manpower each year. The 126th Rose Parade was presented by Honda.
Lisa Brighton of Washington DC. put finishing touches on Donate to Life Float

Lisa Brighton of Washington DC. put finishing touches on Donate to Life Float

Rose Bowl champions Oregon Ducks  (L-R) Tony Washington, Keanon Lowe, Erick Dargan,  Head Coach  Mark Helfrich  Jake Fisher, Derrick Malone

Rose Bowl champions Oregon Ducks
(L-R) Tony Washington, Keanon Lowe, Erick Dargan, Head Coach Mark Helfrich Jake Fisher, Derrick Malone

 

Alejandre Sworn In As San Bernardino County Superintendent

Alejandre taking Administration of Oath led by Mr Mark Sumpter, President, S B County Board of Education (Photo by John Coleman)

Alejandre taking Administration of Oath led by Mr Mark Sumpter, President, S B County Board of Education
(Photo by John Coleman)

SAN BERNARDINO, CA-Ted Alejandre took the oath of office becoming San Bernardino County’s 34th superintendent during a ceremony today at the National Orange Show. Alejandre pledged to form a team among educators, stakeholders, community members and education partners to further academic opportunities for the more than 411,000 students who attend public school in San Bernardino County.

“Together, we will transform lives through education in our county,” Alejandre said.

About 500 community members, family, staff and dignitaries attended the oath of office ceremony. Alejandre was sworn into office by Mark Sumpter, president of the County Board of Education. Starting his career with the San Bernardino County Superintendent of Schools office in 2008 as the assistant superintendent of Business Services, Alejandre brings more than 25 years of experience in public education to his new role as county superintendent. Alejandre is the first-ever Hispanic to serve in the position. Alejandre, who is a native of San Bernardino County, has worked in the Rialto, San Bernardino and Yucaipa-Calimesa school districts as a teacher, principal and administrator, prior to his stint with County Schools.

Power, Justice and the Cheap Blood of Black Males

Hakim Hazim

Hakim Hazim

“Justice is nothing more than the advantage of the stronger.” -Thrasymachus

 By Hakim Hazim

The grand jury decisions in Ferguson and New York should not surprise us. Justice is in the eyes of the beholder and the criminal justice system is not blind. It derives its power from the larger societal framework that simply has many preconceived ideas about Black males. We must work relentlessly to change this and hold the system accountable. We must also support the people who are doing that and exercise patience in the process. Keep in mind the two chief law enforcement officers in this nation are Black: Barack Obama and Eric Holder, and racial tensions are at an all time high. To their credit they are doing quite a bit, but they face an uphill struggle. We should follow their lead on criminal justice reform and we should do everything we can for the young Black men around us before and after tragedy strikes. We should also consistently deplore what we are doing to one another; it’s senseless not too. All of these things reinforce the notion, “Black Blood is cheap.”

Current law enforcement approaches toward us as a people and the tacit societal approval behind it must change. Society inherently nurtures the belief that justice is nothing more than the interest and the sustained advantage of the stronger, and it has played out that way for centuries. The rationale is, “If they did things the right way, they would get what I have and so would their children.”  Such self-righteousness obscures reality.  The fact is people do all they can to give their descendants an advantage in the system and they tilt the scales to their advantage. It’s true with race, power and wealth and gender. It’s simply a human trait of passing the best of your efforts, lessons and acquisitions to your children, but you also pass your biases on as well.

When we first arrived, justice was never considered for us as a people. It was an elusive concept for which we prayed, fought, bled and died for. To this very day, she seems a distant stranger to many of our people still in terms of access, resources, familial ties and fair treatment in terms of the criminal justice system. Although all black people have felt the sting of injustice, poor black folks feel it the most. Having little to bargain with or offer they are viewed as inferior, unworthy and an unnecessary, troublesome burden by many—even middle class and upper class blacks. Our inner cities are filled with Black-on-Black crime, fatherlessness and substandard schools. This fertile ground of dysfunction produces young men who think that they or their peers have little value. Feeling powerless, they prey on one another and lash out at the larger system. This crab in a bucket mentality is celebrated in the music of popular culture. The sad fact is this, many of us have not learn to value one another the way we should and King’s Dream falls on deaf ears to many of the younger generation.

Let’s face the facts: statistics show young people who do well often succeed because of the systems and programs that strengthen them. Things like a solid family structure and access to education, faith-based organizations, mentoring agencies, activity, athletic and interest development organizations and employment services, give young people a fighting chance. If not, their doomed from the womb. The deaths of so many young black males or own the hands of many. The Black-on- Black gang wars, stand your ground advocates and law enforcement officers have all contributed to this. Passivity is not an option. Let your voice be heard, or remain entrenched in hypocrisy. The choice is yours.


 

Hakim Hazim is the founder of Relevant Now and co-founder of Freedom Squared. He is a nationally recognized expert in decision analysis, criminality and security.