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What it do with Lue

What It Do With the LUE: Bringing Awareness to Violence

concert

By Lue Dowdy

Bringing awareness about violence through music is WHAT IT DO! Violence is everywhere. You see it when you turn on the television and when you walk or drive through certain neighborhoods. So why does it have to be in the schools? School should be one of the safest places for our youth. They should be worried about graduating or who they should ask out to prom. Our youth should not have to worry about SAFETY while learning.

Shout out to R&B artist, Yung Muusik, for having a heart to help our youth by putting on a concert in the City of Adelanto. The focus is to bring people together and this is an all age event. feel free to bring out your family for a day of fun and MUSIC. Edwin Johnson of Chord Youth Enrichment Program will be the guest speaker of the evening. The concert will feature performances by local artist such as: Gaim Ov3r, Yung Muusik, Jada J., Princess Anyia, and more.

There will be activities and free giveaways for families. The concert will take place on Saturday, November 18 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the City of the Lord Baptist Church located at 17911 Permain Street in Adelanto. Let’s do our best to spread love and not hate.

Until next week L’z!

Time For Change Foundation’s Founder, Kim Carter, Recognized in Ebony Magazine’s Power 100 List

Kim bio pic

Kim Carter

The EBONY Power 100 is compiled by the editors of EBONY magazine. Each selection is considered a leader in his or her field. Over the past year, these individuals have had a positive impact on the African-American community. They are game changers in their respective fields and have consistently challenged the status quo. The Star-Studded list of other honorees includes people like Oprah Winfrey, R & B legend Rihanna and U.S. Senator Kamala Harris to name a few. Kim Carter is being honored as one of the “Community Crusaders” reflecting a collective of liberators and leaders who affirm the lives of the misrepresented, no matter race, gender or creed. Through philanthropic efforts and activism, these honorees galvanize and nurture our communities with the mission of ensuring liberty and justice for all.

Kim Carter founded the Time for Change Foundation in 2002, helping homeless women and children reach self-sufficiency. Today, she is a powerful leader transforming the lives of those impacted by poverty and incarceration. Kim’s innovation created a plethora of evidence-based program models, including 2 shelters, 13 permanent supportive housing units and developing her first affordable housing project, The Phoenix Square.   Today, the organization’s impact and model is being replicated in 2 different states and the Bay Area.

As a policy fellow, she learned how to navigate the political system and influence policy and laws to advance her cause. Using her past experiences with incarceration and homelessness as the fuel to drive her passion, she has excelled as a notable leader. Through her Center for Housing Advancement & Motivational Projects LLC she does consulting and motivational speaking across the country.   Many call Kim the “Real Deal” because she is a powerful voice for change with dynamic skills that propel others to stand up and take action.

The Ebony Power 100 list features men and women who are truly making a difference in their communities and the world through their work, talent and influence,” says Nationwide Chief Administrative Officer Gale King. “Nationwide congratulates this year’s distinguished honorees and looks forward to celebrating their accomplishments and contributions at this year’s gala.

“My purpose is to do what seems impossible, like ending homelessness and developing leaders from  those that are most impacted by negative social conditions,” says Kim Carter. “Harriet Tubman didn’t quit when she found freedom, she went on to free thousands of slaves… that’s my SHERO!”

The Story Behind the Show: Port Chicago 50 Premieres in Two Weeks

RIALTO, CA- The story of Freddie Meeks, a California resident, and Port Chicago a time in history; dare to remember…

It’s July 17 in Port Chicago, California, a cool summer Friday night at a munitions naval base 30 miles North of San Francisco. The year is 1944 and World War II is in full swing. According to a United States Navy report, “The actual work of loading ammunition and explosives aboard the ships was performed exclusively by Afro-Americans under the supervision of White officers and Afro-American petty officers,” and the routine assignment of Afro-American enlisted personnel to manual labor was clearly motivated by race and premised upon the mistaken notion that they were intellectually inferior and thus incapable of meeting the same standards as their white counterparts.”

But then the unspeakable happened, explosion after explosion – so fierce, it shook the ground with the force of an earthquake. Knocking out windows and shaking buildings as far east as Boulder City, Nevada. The results of the explosion at the naval facility killed or wounded 710 people, 435 of whom were African American. This single disaster accounted for more than 15 percent of all African American naval casualties during World War II.

What happened next is even more mind-boggling than the explosion itself? Following the explosion, many of the African-American survivors, expected to be granted survivors, leave before being reassigned to regular duty, but that leave was not granted, even for those who had been hospitalized. All African-American men were sent back to work loading ammunition under the same officers as before.

Fifty sailors of the United States Navy, all African-American men, refused to resume loading activities under the same conditions and were ultimately tried and convicted of mutiny for failing to obey orders. Thurgood Marshall, then chief counsel for the NAACP, was reported to state he saw no reason why the men should be tried for mutiny, which implies a mass conspiracy, rather than on lesser charges of individual subordination, and blasted the trial by stating that the defendants were being tried for mutiny “solely because of their race and color.” Virtually all of the convicted sailors were released from prison early in 1946 and were given a general discharge from the Navy “under honorable conditions.”

In 1999, Freddie Meeks was pardoned by President Bill Clinton in recognition of the injustice he suffered as one of the convicted sailors, and at the time of his pardon, Mr. Meeks said, “After all these years, the world should know what happened at Port Chicago. It should be cleared up that we did not commit mutiny, and we were charged with that because of our race”. In July 11, 2016 the Assembly Joint Resolution No. 33 was filed with the Secretary of State – it would pardon all of the members of the Port Chicago 50.

Dennis Rowe Entertainment is proud to present Port Chicago 50, a story of love for Country, the American Dream and a quest for Equality and Fairness.

Unbelievable…Emotional…Dramatic…Thought Provoking are some words audiences have used to describe Port Chicago 50. Broadway Producer Woody King, Jr. said “The actors and designers did an excellent job” and Linda Armstrong from New York’s Amsterdam News exclaimed “Everyone should see this show!”

Port Chicago 50 is a must see for everyone and will be a weekend of historical enlightenment! The powerful story is co-written by David Shackelford and Dennis Rowe, and directed by Dennis Rowe. Port Chicago 50 does use some strong language. Port Chicago 50 is presented by Dennis Rowe Entertainment from Los Angeles, California.

The play will kick off on Friday, December 1 in Rialto. To claim you discount on your tickets, please use PROMO code: “IMPROVE.”

Click here to buy your ticket!