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What it do with Lue

Keep Literacy Alive, Come Out to the Leimert Park Book Fair

LOS ANGELES, CA- The Leimert Park Village Book Fair will celebrate its 11th anniversary on Saturday, August 19 in Los Angeles. The book fair will run from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on the promenade of the Baldwin Hills Crenshaw Plaza (BHCP), located at 3650 W. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. The family-oriented event is held in the heart of Leimert Park, which is considered the center of the African American arts/intellectual scene in LA. The book fair will be held outdoors, and luckily, it rarely rains in Southern California!

“Voted One of LA’s Five Best Annual Book Festivals,” the LPVBF has become a much-anticipated cultural tradition in the community.  It provides authors an opportunity to promote their newest work as well as meet some of their fans up close and personal. Meet some of LA’s favorite and best-selling authors like Pamela Samuels Young, Gary Phillips, Tananarive Due, plus Jodi Baker, the YA writer of the “Between Lions” series, which New York Times calls it ” … definitely the YA series to follow.” 

The LPVBF is produced by Exum and Associates in collaboration with Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas, District 2; the Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs; City of Los Angeles and Capri Capital Partners of the Baldwin Hills Crenshaw Plaza mall. City leaders and philanthropists Dr. Bernard W. and Shirley Kinsey serve as the book fair’s chairperson.

San Bernardino Native Serves in Japan Aboard Forward-Deployed Ship

Janeth Delacruz Garcia 

Janeth Delacruz Garcia

By Chief Petty Officer Bill Steele, Navy Office of Community Outreach 

A 2014 Los Altos High School graduate and San Bernardino, California native is serving in Japan in the U.S. Navy aboard USS Germantown.

Fireman Janeth Delacruz Garcia is an engineman aboard the ship operating out of Sasebo, Japan.

A Navy engine man is responsible for the maintenance of diesel engines, high pressure air compressors, lube oil purifiers and main reduction gears on the Germantown.

“Right now, I do a lot of testing of oil and fuel samples from the diesel engines,” said Delacruz Garcia. “I never would have thought I would be working in this field when I joined the Navy.”

With more than 50 percent of the world’s shipping tonnage and a third of the world’s crude oil passing through the region, the U.S. has historic and enduring interests in this part of the world.

“Our alliance is rooted in shared interests and shared values,” said Adm. Harry Harris, U.S. Pacific Command Commander. “It’s not hyperbole to say that the entire world has benefited from the U.S.-Japan alliance. While our alliance helped stabilize the region after the Second World War, it also enabled the Japanese people to bring about an era of unprecedented economic growth. And for the last six decades, our Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines and Coast Guardsmen have worked side by side with the Japan Self Defense Force to protect and advance peace and freedom.”

Commissioned in 1986, Germantown is the second Navy ship named after the Revolutionary War Battle of Germantown. With a crew of more than 900 sailors and Marines, Germantown is 609 feet long and weighs approximately 16,000 tons. Designed specifically to operate landing craft air cushion small craft vessels, Whidbey Island-class dock landing ships have the largest capacity for these landing craft out of any U.S. Navy amphibious ship.

“This is my first command, the work environment is very respectful, they’re all very supportive and communicate well,” said Delacruz Garcia. “Serving in Japan is great, it’s one of my dream places to serve.” 

Sea duty is inherently arduous and challenging but it builds strong fellowship and esprit de corps among members of the crew. The crew is highly motivated and quickly adapt to changing conditions. It is a busy life of specialized work, watches, and drills.

“I’m the first to serve in the Navy in my family,” said Delacruz Garcia. “It’s a huge commitment, I don’t think I could have done it without their support.”

The Navy’s presence in Sasebo is part a long-standing commitment.

“The U.S.-Japan alliance remains the cornerstone for peace and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region,” said Harris.

Fireman Janeth Delacruz Garcia is an engineman aboard the ship operating out of Sasebo, Japan.

A Navy engine man is responsible for the maintenance of diesel engines, high pressure air compressors, lube oil purifiers and main reduction gears on the Germantown.

“Right now I do a lot of testing of oil and fuel samples from the diesel engines,” said Delacruz Garcia. “I never would have thought I would be working in this field when I joined the Navy.”

With more than 50 percent of the world’s shipping tonnage and a third of the world’s crude oil passing through the region, the U.S. has historic and enduring interests in this part of the world.  

“Our alliance is rooted in shared interests and shared values,” said Adm. Harry Harris, U.S. Pacific Command Commander. “It’s not hyperbole to say that the entire world has benefited from the U.S.-Japan alliance. While our alliance helped stabilize the region after the Second World War, it also enabled the Japanese people to bring about an era of unprecedented economic growth. And for the last six decades, our Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines and Coast Guardsmen have worked side by side with the Japan Self Defense Force to protect and advance peace and freedom.”

Commissioned in 1986, Germantown is the second Navy ship named after the Revolutionary War Battle of Germantown. With a crew of more than 900 sailors and Marines, Germantown is 609 feet long and weighs approximately 16,000 tons. Designed specifically to operate landing craft air cushion small craft vessels, Whidbey Island-class dock landing ships have the largest capacity for these landing craft out of any U.S. Navy amphibious ship.

“This is my first command, the work environment is very respectful, they’re all very supportive and communicate well,” said Delacruz Garcia. “Serving in Japan is great, it’s one of my dream places to serve.” 

Sea duty is inherently arduous and challenging but it builds strong fellowship and esprit de corps among members of the crew. The crew is highly motivated and quickly adapt to changing conditions. It is a busy life of specialized work, watches, and drills.

“I’m the first to serve in the Navy in my family,” said Delacruz Garcia. “It’s a huge commitment, I don’t think I could have done it without their support.”

The Navy’s presence in Sasebo is part a long-standing commitment.

“The U.S.-Japan alliance remains the cornerstone for peace and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region,” said Harris.

What It Do With the LUE: The Youth

By Lue Dowdy

The YOUTH IS WHAT IT DO!

It is going down Saturday, October 14 in the beautiful city of San Bernardino. Congratulations to the following individuals for making the I.E. Show It Off 2017 talent competition: Alaondraa Smith, Ty’Ren Tillet, Sheniya Jackson, Xager 8 Dance Crew, Elizabeth Estrella, LaTisha Williams, Moena Parker, Daharien Trotter, Jack Musgrove, and Jahzara and Djehuty (The Garbutt Siblings).

The contestants will be competing for a $500.00 cash prize. Good Luck! Until next time, L’z!