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What it do with Lue

Supervisor Josie Gonzales honors Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

(left to right) Hattie Inge, President of Rialto Black History Committee; Myron Hester Sr., Master of Ceremonies; Joanne Gilbert, Community Service Award Recipient; Elvis Brown, Minister; Sup. Gonzales, Dr. Joel McCloud, Chancellor; Valerie Singleton, Psalmist; Pastor Chuck Singleton, Community Service Award recipient; Assemblymember Cheryl Brown; Congressman Pete Aguilar; and Mike Story, City of Rialto Administrator at Rialto Black History Committee, Inc. 30th Annual Dr. MLK Luncheon.

(left to right) Hattie Inge, President of Rialto Black History Committee; Myron Hester Sr., Master of Ceremonies; Joanne Gilbert, Community Service Award Recipient; Elvis Brown, Minister; Sup. Gonzales, Dr. Joel McCloud, Chancellor; Valerie Singleton, Psalmist; Pastor Chuck Singleton, Community Service Award recipient; Assemblymember Cheryl Brown; Congressman Pete Aguilar; and Mike Story, City of Rialto Administrator at Rialto Black History Committee, Inc. 30th Annual Dr. MLK Luncheon.

FONTANA, CA- Residents throughout the County of San Bernardino gathered over the weekend to honor one of the most inspiring and influential activists in United States history. “Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is a testament to how the strength and service of one individual can uplift a community and collectively change the world,” Supervisor Josie Gonzales stated. “I was honored to join friends and colleagues at the Rialto Black History Committee, Inland Empire Concern African American Churches, and Bethel AME Church in Fontana to celebrate the life of such a historically iconic individual.”

King High School Senior Gets Full Ride to Pepperdine

King High School senior Brooke Tolson with her parents Andamo and Gayla at the Posse Foundation awards event.

King High School senior Brooke Tolson with her parents Andamo and Gayla at the Posse Foundation awards event.

RIVERSIDE, CA- Brooke Tolson, a senior at Martin Luther King High School in Riverside, was awarded the highly acclaimed Posse Foundation scholarship in Los Angeles on January 7. The Posse Foundation founded in 1989 identifies the best and brightest multicultural students from public high schools with exceptional academic and leadership potential. These students are awarded a four-year full tuition scholarship to attend one of 51 top colleges and universities in the nation. The Posse model is rooted in the belief that a small diverse group of talented students, a Posse, carefully selected and trained can serve as a catalyst increased individual and community development. For 25 years, Posse has awarded $668 million scholarship awards. Over 2400 students were nominated out of Los Angeles for the 100 scholarships that were awarded.

Brooke is in the top 10 percent of her graduating class and has a 4.33 GPA. She is involved in Cheer, Link Crew, BSU, the Adventure Club, California Scholastic Federation and National Honor Society, while having perfect attendance at King High School. She is a tutor at Mathnasium and has traveled to Haiti with Vacation Bible School to teach English. Brooke will be attending Pepperdine University in the fall to study elementary education with career aspirations of becoming a teacher. Brooke is the daughter of Gayla and Andamo Tolson and the sister of Enrico and Austin Tolson.

Whatever Happened to an Old-Fashioned Handshake?

Dr. James L. Snyder

Dr. James L. Snyder

By Dr. James L. Snyder

I must confess I do have some old-fashioned biases. I would be the first to admit I’m not up to date on the latest fad or trend.

I come from that era that believed the well-dressed man is one that doesn’t stand out from everybody else. I’ve tried to keep to that all these years. I certainly don’t want to stand out and have people recognize me or point their finger at me and whispered to each other.

For years, I’ve been very careful about that. Now, it seems that because I try to dress like a well-dressed man and not stand out I am in fact standing out. Nobody, except me and two other people, really care about being well-dressed.

This has never been an issue with me and it even now is not an issue. But reflecting on the past year and looking forward to the year before me, I have to take some calculations. According to my calculation, I no longer fit into that “well-dressed man” category, because the term “well-dressed man” does not mean what it used to mean.

I hate it when something outlasts its definition.

To be a well-dressed man today, according to the latest fads and trends I have noticed, I need to throw away my belt and let my trousers drop all the way down to my knees.

Let me go on record as saying, never in a million years will that happen.

Then there is the issue about a necktie. Am I the last person on planet earth wearing a necktie?

Very few people today know how to tie a necktie. Well, I do and I will until they put me in a casket and then I hope I’m still wearing a tie. So if you come to my funeral and look at me in the casket and I’m not wearing a tie, complain to someone for me.

The latest trends and fads have no interest to me whatsoever.

This came to my attention recently when I had to sign some legal papers for something to do with the church. I had to sign here, initial there, sign the next page, initial three pages and it went on and on until I ran out of ink.

I’m one of those old-fashioned guys that use a fountain pen and all that signing and initialing drained all of the ink out of my fountain pen. Before I finished, I was on the verge of carpal tunnel.

I sighed rather deeply, looked at the gentleman (I think he was a gentleman because he was dressed like a gentleman), and said kind of sarcastically, “Do you remember the old-fashioned handshake?”

He looked at me without smiling and then said, “Here are some more papers for you to sign.”

I thought I was signing my life away, but in reality, I was just signing my ink away.

I do remember when a handshake really meant something. Just about everything was sealed with a handshake and both parties were as good as their word. It would take a lot of undoing to undo that handshake. Now, you’re only as good as the word on a piece of paper over your signature. Then, some lawyer can finagle it around to mean something other than what you really meant it in the first place. So what’s the purpose of all this?

I know you’re not supposed to say this, but I will, I sure long for the good old days when a handshake was all you needed. I get tired of the rigmarole passing as business these days. I get tired of paperwork that’s piled higher than the tallest tree in the forest.

Of course, if we go back to that handshake scenario, it will put many lawyers out of business. What would these people do for a living? I have some ideas, but I’m going to keep that to myself.

Trust has gone out of our culture today because everybody is only after what they can get for themselves and they don’t care how they get it.

A handshake met something in “the day.” In fact, I believe it was more binding than all of the paperwork and signed documents and legalese we have today. It’s hard to sue a handshake!

What I want to know is simply this. When we replaced the good old-fashioned handshake with all of this legalese stuff, are we better off? Have we simplified everything and covered all of the bases?

The answer is a loud no.

A man’s word used to be his bond and something he would never go back on.

The Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage and I have lived on that marital philosophy all of our married life. I know in the marriage ceremony there is no “handshake.” But the philosophy of that handshake is right there. When I said “I do,” and she responded by another “I do,” we were shaking hands and saying to everybody around us but particularly to one another, “We do.”

I think James shook the right hand when he wrote, “But above all things, my brethren, swear not, neither by heaven, neither by the earth, neither by any other oath: but let your yea be yea; and your nay, nay; lest ye fall into condemnation” (James 5:12).

I’m all for getting back to the good old days when a handshake was all you needed.


Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@att.net or website www.jamessnyderministries.com.