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What it do with Lue

LUE PRODUCTIONS: YOUTH HOLIDAY TALENT SHOWCASE

youth showcase

YOUTH HOLIDAY TALENT SHOWCASEWhat it do I.E. and neighboring cities! Happy to be back again this week to let you know WHAT IT DO! Well, it’s about our young folks. Our community is saturated with talented youth and teens looking for events to showcase their skills. I’ve witnessed children on more than one occasion at several neighborhood events singing, dancing, and rapping. Come on let’s be honest, how many of you have given Lil’ Jon Jon or Sara a dollar or two to perform at the family function because they have amazing talent? I know I’m guilty of it.

Please help us spread the word about our FREE YOUTH auditions. Let’s get them off the streets and on the STAGE! The “Youth Holiday Talent Showcase” is sponsored by LUE Productions, Westside Story Newspaper, Black Chamber of Commerce Inland Cities, Family First Entertainment, Pretty Pockets, Cold Cutz Barber Shop, and Blaim Society. The event will be held on Saturday, December 13th.

We are calling all Gospel acts, singers, singing groups, poets, dancers, rappers, comedians, and more, as well as youth hosts and models. Registration is free to sign up, and if you are selected you must sale tickets. All participants must be 19 and under. Auditions will be held on Sunday, September 14 from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday, September 27 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

You may send us an audition tape if unable to make the auditions. Please send it to Lue.info@yahoo.com. Please make sure that your footage is no longer than 3 minutes. All final contestants will be contacted by Monday, September 29.

A SUGGESTION FOR FIGHTING EBOLA…

BOTTOM LINE…PUBLISHER’S COMMENTARY BY WALLACE J. ALLEN

Dr. Ahmses Maat (left)

Dr. Ahmses Maat (left)

Preventing death from the Ebola virus is possible if it is true that the Ebola virus lives about 20 to 29 days, and if it is true, the virus must have high fever heat in order to achieve the deadly stage where the blood erupts from the capillaries. We are not sure the virus needs high fever heat in order to reach this stage, but we do know that high fever heat has been present in each case that death has occurred. Therefore we say “if” the patient can be cooled, MAYBE death will be prevented.

The concept is to ward off the high fever temperature associated with the bleeding out stage. If the patient’s body temperature is kept at 100 degrees Fahrenheit, well below the temperature that accompanies the bleeding out stage, the life-cycle of the virus can possibly complete without killing the patient.

How can patients prevent high fever temperature? We know that modern cooling methods require power and supplies that are not available, nor deliverable to where needed; however, we also know that there is a cooling method that is available to most victims and that it is basically free.

My friend and associate, Dr. Ahmses Maat, (Doctorate of Metaphysics,  Registered Respiratory Therapist, Certified Clinical Perfusionist, President of TaMeri Inc.),  is prescribing a  “Mud Bath Series” that allows the patient to cool as needed, either with the assistance of an aide or without. The ability to determine body temperature during the process is the one thing that may be a problem, thermometers are needed.

Dr. Maat suggests that a hole, two to three feet deep by four feet wide by six to seven feet long, be dug out from the ground. Half of the dirt should be placed back in the hole along with water to make the mud. A plastic liner can be used but is not necessary.  The patient should lay in the mud bath and cool him/her self as needed. This process should be repeated until the fever no longer returns.

We are aware of the social disruption that makes servicing the Ebola victims almost impossible.  It would be great to have 5000 doctors and 20,000 beds and the vaccine and “best practice” procedure to fight this battle, but until that occurs we must submit that reasonable care that does no harm should be afforded the victims.

As usual your comments are important; however, if you are able to communicate this concept to someone on the ground in West Africa, please do so.  We are not trying to “get paid,” we want to save lives.

 

 

Abused Women: Why They Stay, Why They Leave

Ray Rice and Janay Rice

Ray Rice and Janay Rice

By Jameelah Medina, PhD

We have all heard about (former) NFL player, Ray Rice, receiving a 2-game suspension for a domestic altercation with his former fiancée. Janay Rice, who is now his wife, explained that she was partially at fault for the violence that led to being unconscious in an elevator; however, most did not know the extent of the violence. We all know that it takes a serious amount of force to render someone unconscious, but the recent release of the entire surveillance video showing how she lost consciousness set off a storm. In short, the video shows Mr. Rice reaching for her before they enter the elevator. Once in the elevator, he strikes her. She responds by pushing him, and he hits her again hard enough to knock her to the floor. On her way down, her head hits a handle bar in the elevator. Once on the floor, she does not move; she is unconscious. He is forced to drag her seemingly lifeless body from the elevator and out of the building.

While many were appalled at his violent actions, many chose to focus on  Mrs. Rice. They asked questions like, “Why did she stay with him?” “How could she marry him?” “Why would she lie for him?” “How could she sit at that press conference and support him so publicly?” While it is very easy to judge an abused woman, her behavior and choices; it is actually better to try to understand the psychological nature of abuse and the psychology of the abused and battered.

Relationships hardly ever start out abusive. There is a process of breaking in and breaking down a victim. This process involves possessiveness, isolation, verbal and emotional abuse, and other tactics. Women who have experienced physical, emotional, sexual or other forms of abuse as girls are at greater risk for entering into an abusive relationship. For many, become accustomed to seeing violence as a way in which love is shown. Others may have low self-esteem in general or at least when it comes to romantic relationships. While others see potential in the abuser and believe that they can help the abuser change.

Many women, especially in the African American community, also have an aversion to involving the authorities in domestic disputes; they would rather take the abuse than offer their abusive partner up to the criminal justice system. Within the African American community, there is also the stigma of being seen as weak and the stereotype of “the strong, black woman.” This often keeps African American women silent about the abuse they suffer.

Over 85 percent of domestic violence (DV) or intimate partner violence (IPV) is against women, and one in every three women will experience IPV in her lifetime. More than 33% of teenage girls already report experiencing violence in a dating relationship. Abused women are often killed by their abusive partners, and the most dangerous time is when she is leaving or has just left the relationship. Roughly 72% of all murder-suicides are the result of IPV. It also takes roughly 7-8 attempts at leaving before the woman leave for the final time. Many often wonder why these women stay and judge them harshly for doing so. Just because a woman stays with her abuser does not mean that she does not want to end the abuse or leave the relationship. Most times, she has carefully weighed her options and the safest one is remaining where she is. She may remain in hopes of changing the abuser or simply to buy herself more time to plan a safe exit. Most people think of leaving as a one-time event. However, leaving an abusive relationship is a process. Once a woman is committed to leaving the relationship, it may take her months or even years before the process is finalized. And, until the very end, she runs the risk of losing her life to the abuser. If there are children involved, the leaving process is further complicated.

I do not particularly care for the NFL nor do I think they deserve applause for ending Ray Rice’s contract. However, I believe that this case represents an excellent time for our community to openly and honestly discuss DV and IPV, especially with our pre-teen and teen population.